Courtesy Rachel Sundheim

“John Carpenter’s 'Halloween' is my favorite horror film,” says Gina Wohlsdorf as she explains the germ of her new novel, the acclaimed 'Security.' “I wondered why it didn’t exist in book form. I’ve read really widely in horror, it’s a great genre but I’ve never seen a slasher novel. So I tried to write one and thought, ‘Well, that’s why you don’t see slasher novels. This is terrible.’”

Author Jane Hamilton’s latest book, The Excellent Lombards, examines big questions facing a Wisconsin farm family as they prepare for the future. Hamilton says that the novel is in part inspired by her own family’s experience with the change nature of rural life.

Public radio talk show host Diane Rehm started writing her book, On My Own, one night as she began her life on her own. Her husband of 54 years, John Rehm, was on his 10th day of refusing food, water, and medication. He had been suffering with Parkinson's disease for years. KMUW's Beth Golay spoke to Diane Rehm from her studio at WAMU in Washington.

Lauren Groff's audacious novel, Fates and Furies, is an astounding portrait of a marriage. Amazing sentences build seductive paragraphs that breathe life into every providential scene.

For me, a good book has well drawn characters, an intriguing plot, language that disappears so I am transported, the transcendence of an individual’s experience to the universal, and finally redemption or resolution. The Thing About Jellyfish, a debut novel for middle-grade readers by Ali Benjamin, is a good book.

Book reviewer Sarah Bagby says a new novel pays tribute to earlier work, but still manages to be a true original.

I have been a sucker for the beguiling voice of Elizabeth Gilbert ever since I read her profile of Hank Williams III in the December 2000 issue of GQ.

I sought out the books she’d published before that article and have read everything since. She had a freak success with her love-it-or deal-with-it memoir Eat Pray Love.

Andrew Malan Milward, a Lawrence, Kan. native, received accolades from Stewart O’Nan and Lauren Groff for his Kansas stories, The Agriculture Hall of Fame. His latest collection, I Was a Revolutionary, expands Milward’s examination of his home state through the art of fiction.

The scene that opens Bill Clegg's impressive novel Did You Ever Have A Family is of a fire burning down Jane Ried's home.

Stephanie Clifford is a crime writer for the New York Times. She moved to New York from Seattle and has the perfect vantage point to tell the age-old story of wanting what we can’t have.