cancer

Mike Sherry / Heartland Health Monitor

The University of Kansas Cancer Center today submitted its application to the National Cancer Institute to become a “comprehensive” cancer center.

If the cancer center does receive the highly coveted designation, it would become just the 48th institution in the country to do so, joining the likes of the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

Scientists and doctors at such centers do basic laboratory research and clinical trials, as well as study the patterns, causes and control of cancer in populations.

American Cancer Society Youtube

The American Cancer Society is looking for more volunteers to help cancer patients who need transportation to their treatments.

The organization is rebuilding its Road To Recovery program in the Wichita area and in Reno County. The program matches volunteer drivers to cancer patients who need rides to and from cancer-related care.

Jason & Megan Mills / Flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas House has approved a measure today that would prohibit minors from using tanning devices such as sun lamps and tanning beds.

Representatives voted 77 to 44 in favor of the bill. Salon owners could be fined up to $250 and incur disciplinary action for allowing people under 18 to use tanning devices.

Jim McClean / Heartland Health Monitor

A bill that would prohibit minors from using commercial tanning beds that was stopped two years ago appears to be on its way to passing out of a Kansas House committee.

The bill appears to have the votes to pass out of the House Health and Human Services Committee despite testimony against it from Joseph Levy.

Levy is a lobbyist for the tanning industry. He says the American Cancer Society and other supporters of the bill are overstating the dangers of indoor tanning.

“The case that’s been made goes well beyond the facts," Levy says.

Jim McClean / Heartland Health Monitor

Amy Holdman has a cautionary tale for Kansas lawmakers. The 41-year-old mother of two from Overland Park will be in Topeka today to speak in favor of a bill that would prohibit anyone under the age of 18 from using ultraviolet tanning beds.

Holdman has had three surgeries in just the last year to remove melanoma skin cancers from her arms.

She and her doctors believe that her frequent use of tanning beds as a teenager and young adult is the likely cause.

Cancer is becoming the No. 1 killer in more and more states as deaths from heart disease have declined, new health statistics show.

Nationwide, heart disease is still the leading cause of death, just ahead of cancer. While death rates for both have been falling for nearly 25 years, heart disease has dropped at a steeper rate.

As a result, cancer moved up to the top slot in 22 states in 2014, according to the latest government figures.

It's also the leading cause of death in certain groups of people, including Hispanics, Asians, and adults ages 40 to 79.

Yongjiet, flickr Creative Commons

The new guideline released by the American Cancer Society is the first update since 2003.

Communications Manager Brian Ortner, says the guideline is based on the latest science.

He says evidence clearly supports starting annual screenings at age 45, but it’s a balance.

Ortner says there’s some risk of harm associated with early screenings like biopsies for false-positive imaging tests or possible overdiagnosis.

Carla Eckels / KMUW

September marks National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. It’s the most common cancer in men in America, and is a leading cause of cancer death in men. A prostate cancer support group will meet Monday at a Wichita hospital to discuss the latest information on the disease.

Kansas is in the bottom half of the class in a new report from the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network.

The report judges states on nine policies relating to cancer control and prevention. Kansas draws praise for raising tobacco taxes this year, for cancer pain control policies, and for its statewide Indoor Clean Air Act. But the state received failing marks for six other policy areas.

Deborah Shaar

It’s estimated that more than 14,000 people in Kansas will receive a new cancer diagnosis this year. A little less than half will be women and the majority of those new cases will be for breast cancer.

There are support programs available to help women manage the appearance-related side effects once treatment begins.

KMUW’s Deborah Shaar reports on the “Look Good, Feel Better” program offered by the American Cancer Society.

A short, upbeat video provides the first introduction to the Look Good, Feel Better Program.

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