Commentary

This commentary originally aired on February 23, 2017.  

Nintendo has been the leader in portable video gaming ever since they basically invented the market segment with the Game Boy in 1989. That doesn’t mean they’ve been the only player, though. 

Maybe I’m weird. But it seems to me there is an awful lot of dystopian entertainment out there these days. Everybody who makes movies that deal with the future seems to think we ain’t seen nothing yet.

Either apes or robots or aliens or cruel gargantuan corporations or, I don’t know, maybe vegans are going to take over. Even the weather’s going to be horrible. Corruption and oppression will reign supreme. Disneyland’s “Carousel of Progress” theme song, “There’s a Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow” is going to be replaced by something like “Life Sucks and Then You Die.”

Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of Russian involvement in the 2016 presidential election is likely to continue for some time.

If there’s one thing I’ve come around to over the years, it’s the non-gender-specific pronoun.

Long before Donald Trump made profane comments about restricting the number of immigrants from certain countries to the U.S., the history of American immigration policy possessed explicit racial characteristics.

Not quite a memoir, not quite a collection of essays, Maggie O’Farrell’s I Am, I Am, I Am is a group of personal narratives recounting the times when her life edged dangerously close to death. The subtitle, “Seventeen Brushes with Death,” is powerful in itself, but even more so when you read what she experienced.

Marginalia: Jojo Moyes

Feb 2, 2018

When Jojo Moyes wrote Me Before You in 2012, she wasn’t expecting to write a follow-up. But the unlikely heroine of that book, Louisa Clark, just wouldn’t leave her. So Moyes penned After You, which was published in 2015. Louisa Clark kept speaking to her, so Moyes wrote Still Me, which hit the shelves this week.

Jojo Moyes is on tour this week, but I caught up with her via phone to talk about the unplanned series, her research, and what she’s working on next. Here’s our conversation:

And here's the shorter commentary from on-air:

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Weston Townsley

Weston Townsley plays drums with Not Cops and The Somber Arrows. He is also a photographer and sous chef at Siena Tuscan Steakhouse.

The director Ernst Lubitsch said, “Any good movie is filled with secrets. If a director doesn’t leave anything unsaid, it’s a lousy movie.” It’s a good bet, then, that Lubitsch would have loved Paul Thomas Anderson’s new film, Phantom Thread, where what’s left unsaid is weaponized and turned into the artillery of a smoldering power struggle.

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