Congress

Frank Morris / KCUR and NPR

One year ago Thursday, the national news media turned its attention to Olathe, Kansas, where Adam Purinton allegedly screamed racist taunts before shooting two Indian tech workers and another man who tried to defend them at Austin’s Bar and Grill.

One of the Indian men was killed, and the United States Department of Justice labeled it a hate crime.

The shooting sparked a discussion about xenophobia in the age of Trump, but it also drew attention to what some consider a broken visa system for high-tech workers.

Wichita State University

Wichita State University President John Bardo was on Capitol Hill Monday morning advocating for further federal investment in STEM higher education.

Speaking before Congress' Research and Technology subcommittee, Bardo highlighted WSU's Innovation Campus and its focus on research and development aimed at the region's needs. WSU's apprenticeship program was also emphasized.

Stephan Bisaha / KMUW

Kansas school districts and municipalities are rushing to save millions of dollars before the Republican tax plan makes that impossible.

File Photo / Kansas News Service

At first glance, the Alabama Senate race doesn’t appear to offer many clues about what the 2018 election has in store.

There isn’t likely to be another campaign in which a marginal candidate attempts to hold serve for a sharply divided party while fighting unprecedented allegations of sexual misconduct under a national spotlight.

“To be sure, Roy Moore was a flawed and controversial candidate,” said Patrick Miller, a University of Kansas political scientist. “He put a race into play that never should have been in play.”

File Photo/Kansas News Service

Political forecasters attempting to gauge the chances for a power shift in Congress are watching several key 2018 races across the country, including two in Kansas.

In the 3rd District, several Democrats are competing for the right to challenge four-term Republican Kevin Yoder, and in the 2nd District, a former Democratic candidate for governor hopes to claim an open seat.

Stephan Bisaha / KMUW

Students rallied on Kansas university campuses on Wednesday as part of a day of demonstrations nationwide against Republican tax reform efforts that could make higher education more expensive.


Courtesy Democratic Policy and Communications Committee video

Democrats in the U.S. Senate on Wednesday used a group of like-minded witnesses to attack President Donald Trump’s tax cut plan by comparing it to what they repeatedly referred to as Kansas’ “failed” tax experiment.

Zach Gibson / Getty Images/NPR.org

U.S. Senator Jerry Moran of Kansas is part of a bipartisan congressional effort trying to get legislation passed that would continue a federal student loan program.

File photo

Four of six members of Kansas' congressional delegation are supporting a proposed federal tax code being developed by House and Senate Republicans.

U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts, and Reps. Lynn Jenkins, Roger Marshall and Ron Estes all said Wednesday they support legislation that would reduce the corporate income tax rate from 35 to 20 percent. It also would reduce the top individual income tax rate from 39 percent to 35 percent.

nostri-imago / Flickr / Creative Commons

One order of business for Congress after the Labor Day holiday: re-upping the Farm Bill, which expires next year. Currently, there is hope for a bipartisan success this fall.

The farm bill provides subsidies for farmers and governs the food stamp program, and it has traditionally skirted the worst of partisan politics.

But vacancies at the top of the Agriculture Department mean fewer leaders working on the farm bill.

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