Congress

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One order of business for Congress after the Labor Day holiday: re-upping the Farm Bill, which expires next year. Currently, there is hope for a bipartisan success this fall.

The farm bill provides subsidies for farmers and governs the food stamp program, and it has traditionally skirted the worst of partisan politics.

But vacancies at the top of the Agriculture Department mean fewer leaders working on the farm bill.

KCUR/File photo

On any given school day at Kansas City Kansas Public Schools, students with disabilities receive an array of medical and support services, from physical therapy to help from nurses.

The services are meant to ensure access to education for all children, said Michelle Colvin, director of special education for the district.

“All means all,” Colvin said. “It benefits us to include everyone in our education system.”

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Senate Republicans on Thursday unveiled their plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act — also known as Obamacare. The long-awaited plan marks a big step toward achieving one of the Republican Party's major goals.

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Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

This post was updated Wednesday at 10:54 a.m. to reflect Sen. Moran's statement on the Senate health care bill. 

Disability rights advocates are among the strongest opponents of the Obamacare replacement legislation that Republicans are attempting to push through Congress.

If anything resembling the bill that the U.S. House approved in May or the one the Senate now is considering passes, they say it will roll back decades of progress.

Susan Walsh/AP

Former FBI Director James Comey is testifying before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence today, speaking publicly for the first time since he was fired by President Trump nearly a month ago. Senators are expected to press Comey on the circumstances surrounding his dismissal as well as the investigation into Russian interference in the U.S. election.

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Kansas' newest member of Congress is at the center of the emerging Obamacare repeal-and-replace debate. Republican Roger Marshall – a doctor from Great Bend – is quick to call the health reform law a failure.

But the replacement bill that he supports – which was introduced this week – is drawing fire from both constituents and health policy researchers. 

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas 2nd District Republican Rep. Lynn Jenkins says she will leave her seat at the end of this term and explore jobs in the private sector.

There have been rumors about her running for Kansas governor in 2018, as Gov. Sam Brownback's second term will be ending. In a statement, Jenkins seems to put those rumors to rest.

"I will not be running for any office in 2018. In two years, at the conclusion of this Congress, I plan to retire and explore opportunities to return to the private sector, allowing a new citizen legislator to step up and serve Kansans," Jenkins says.

Peggy Lowe / KCUR

Heading into the Aug. 2 primary, Republican Congressman Tim Huelskamp is in a desperate fight against a political newcomer to keep his seat in Kansas’ "Big First" District. But as election reporter Peggy Lowe reports, Huelskamp already lost one important battle: the backing of the state’s powerful agricultural interests.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / flickr Creative Commons

The U.S. House passed a national standard for labeling food containing genetically-modified organisms, or GMOs, yesterday. But as Harvest Public Media’s Peggy Lowe reports, consumers may still have problems getting that information.

The bill, now passed by both the House and Senate, allows companies three ways to disclose that there are GMOs in their products. They can put text directly on the package, offer a phone number or website, or they can use a QR code that a shopper can scan with a smart phone.

LID / flickr Creative Commons

Time is running out for Congress to get a bill passed requiring food with genetically modified ingredients to be labeled.

July 1 is when a mandatory GMO labeling law kicks in in Vermont, so Congress has been trying to get something on the books before then in hopes of setting a national standard. Without that, food companies warn of “chaos” in the marketplace.

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