Daguerreotypes

If you’ve been to the Wichita Art Museum to see the daguerreotype exhibition Photographic Wonders but did not go downstairs, you missed a significant show.

Typically, WAM does a call-and-response structure with the main attraction upstairs and a response show downstairs. But this response show, Five Alchemists: Contemporary Photographers Explore 19th-century Techniques, marks three important landmarks for WAM:

Nelson Gallery Foundation

The Wichita Art Museum has dedicated a large portion of its gallery space to highlighting photographic processes.

A collection of daguerreotypes, on loan from the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, officially opens Saturday night. KMUW’s Sean Sandefur toured the collection of 82 images and has this report...

    

On the second floor of the Wichita Art Museum, curator Lisa Volpe stands just outside of a dark gallery, which houses "Photographic Wonders: American Daguerreotypes from The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art."

Courtesy photo

    

The Wichita Art Museum has unveiled their newest exhibition Photographic Wonders: American Daguerreotypes from the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. A Daguerreotype is one of the earliest forms of photography. Invented in France by Louis Daguerre in 1839, Daguerre revolutionized scientific observation as well as art. He discovered how to fix an image on to a silver plate with out it fading away – something his predecessors had not yet solved.