Derek Schmidt

The U.S. Army, flickr Creative Commons

Documents provided to Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt have revealed very little about the Obama administration's plans to close the Guantanamo Bay detention facility.

Schmidt said in a release that the documents that he had requested by way of the Freedom of Information Act were entirely redacted. All 345 pages were empty, with the exception of the words "Plan for closing the Guantanamo Bay Detention facility" and the word "confidential."

Americasroof, Wikipedia

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt joined counterparts in two other states Tuesday to ask president-elect Donald Trump to help them block detainee transfers from the Guantanamo Bay detention center.

Schmidt and the attorneys-general from Colorado and South Carolina sent a letter to Trump asking him to work with President Obama on the issue. In the letter, they ask Trump to make sure the "outgoing administration will not seek to close Guantanamo or transfer any current detainees to our homeland."

Joe Gratz / flickr Creative Commons

Kansas is one of 21 states suing the U.S. Department of Labor over a new rule regarding overtime pay.

If the rule stands, close to 4 million additional workers in the U.S. would be eligible for extra compensation when they work more than 40 hours a week. That's because the Department of Labor ordered a change that effectively doubles the wage threshold at which a worker can be deemed "exempt" from overtime pay.

All workers who make less than $47,476 a year will be eligible. The rule includes government employees.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansans can learn about the state’s open government laws at a series of trainings starting next week.

Tim Evanson, flickr Creative Commons

Thirteen states including Kansas are asking a federal appeals court to review the Environmental Protection Agency's recent regulations on the oil and gas industry.

The EPA made a final ruling on emission standards affecting new, reconstructed and modified oil and gas operations. Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt has asked for judicial review of one of the three new rules, specifically the rule that relates to regulating emissions of methane, a greenhouse gas.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

A federal lawsuit challenging Kansas’ school funding system has been dismissed.

Petrella v. Brownback was filed in 2010 by a group of parents and students in the Shawnee Mission School District who argued that a state limit on local authorities to raise and spend money on local schools violated the U.S. Constitution.

Storem / flickr Creative Commons

Concealed carry applications in Kansas dropped during the 2016 fiscal year.

Between July 1, 2015, and June 30, 2016, about 5800 people applied for a Kansas license to carry a concealed firearm.

Attorney General Derek Schmidt says that’s a "steep decline" from the previous fiscal year, when the state received almost 10,000 applications. It's the third year in a row that the number has dropped.

Jason Rojas / Flickr

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt has asked the state Supreme Court to reconsider its opinions in a group of DUI cases in light of a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision.

People from the Kansas Attorney General’s office will be at the Kechi Fair Saturday to talk about identity theft and child safety.

Representatives from Attorney General Derek Schmidt’s office will hand out free child identification kits at the fair. The kits allow parents to keep a child’s records on hand, such as fingerprints, height and weight, and a current photo. There is also a a place to record important medical information, and each kit comes with a swab to take a DNA sample. Law enforcement can use the identity kits to find missing children more quickly.

Ken Hawkins, Creative Commons

A settlement has been reached in a claim against e-book publishers and Apple Inc. Kansas consumers will be able to receive refund checks or account credits.

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt on Monday released information about the price-fixing case against Apple. Kansas and 32 other states sued Apple for its participation in a conspiracy with publishers to charge more for electronic books than the market rate.

Apple appealed the case, but when the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear it, the settlement became final.

Pages