Derek Schmidt

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt has picked a former state Bar Association president to lead the division in Schmidt's office that handles civil lawsuits.

Schmidt announced Monday that Dennis Depew has been appointed deputy attorney general.

Depew is from Neodesha in southeast Kansas and has had a private law practice for more than 30 years. He served as the Kansas Bar Association's president in 2013 and 2014.

He also serves on Neodesha's board of education. He was a member of the board from 1985 to 1999 and was re-elected again in 2009.

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt says new federal regulations threaten home health care services in Kansas.

Schmidt asked a federal appeals court on Monday to affirm a lower court ruling that blocked new U.S. Department of Labor regulations. In a court brief, Schmidt argued the federal agency overstepped its authority by s requiring overtime pay for home health care workers and reducing the services they can provide.

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt's office says it has paid outside attorneys nearly $1.2 million dollars to defend anti-abortion laws that have been enacted since January 2011.

The attorney general's office reported Monday that it has paid almost $770,000 to the Lawrence firm of Thompson, Ramsdell & Qualseth for fees and expenses in handling multiple federal and state lawsuits.

Abortion providers sued the state over special regulations adopted in 2011, and over a 2013 law requiring them to post certain material on their websites for women seeking abortions.

Republican Attorney General Derek Schmidt wants a chance to argue in court that Kansas Democrats are legally obligated to pick a new nominee for the U.S. Senate election this November.

On Thursday, Schmidt's office asked a three-judge panel in Shawnee County District Court for permission to file friend-of-the-court arguments in a disgruntled voter's lawsuit. A hearing in the case is set for Monday.

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt wants to get a lawsuit by the state's largest teachers' union over a new law that ends guaranteed tenure in public schools dismissed.

Schmidt filed his request Monday in Shawnee County District Court in response to the Kansas National Education Association's lawsuit.

The attorney general says the KNEA has no standing to sue over the tenure law because it is not directly harmed. He also argues the union can't show that any individual has been harmed since the law took effect in July.

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt has named Jeff Chanay as his deputy chief attorney general.

Chanay previously led the office's civil litigation division. He joined the attorney general's staff when Schmidt took office in January 2011. He'd previously had a private law practice in Topeka for 24 years.

As chief deputy, Chanay will replace John Campbell, who'd been with Schmidt from the beginning of his tenure but who stepped down for health reasons recently.

Kan. Attorney Gen. Derek Schmidt is holding a meeting Wednesday, May 28, to discuss regulations for signs that people must post to keep guns off their premises. Schmidt's office is soliciting public input about what should be required for the new "no-gun signs."

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt is offering guidance on how the state's concealed carry law applies to buildings used as polling places on election days.

A legislative committee is recommending a bill to amend the state's so-called Hard 50 sentencing law. The changes would allow juries to decide if convicted murderers deserve 50 years in prison without the possibility of parole.

Under the old system, judges would decide if a crime warranted the harsher sentence of 50 years without parole. But the U.S. Supreme Court recently said judges can't make those decisions.

The bill would also apply some changes retroactively to past crimes. Some attorneys told the committee that it would be unconstitutional to do that.

A legislative committee is expected to meet Monday to begin work on modifying the state's so-called Hard 50 sentencing law.

A recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling raised questions about whether the law could stand as-is. The Kansas law allows judges to sentence convicted murderers to life in prison without the possibility of parole for 50 years. The committee is headed by Representative Lance Kinzer, a Republican from Olathe. Kinzer says the committee will hold a public hearing on a fix proposed by Attorney General Derek Schmidt.