drought

U.S. Geological Survey

The Kansas Water Office is promoting Water Alert, a service that brings instant, customized updates about water conditions to Kansas residents.

The U.S. Geological Survey created Water Alert to give people timely information about river, lake and groundwater conditions. It's a nationwide service, but there are over a dozen data collection stations in the Wichita area alone.

City Officials: The Drought Is Over

Aug 9, 2013

City of Wichita officials announced Friday the drought that threatened the area’s water supply the two past summers and heightened conservation efforts is officially over.

In a release Friday, the city reports Cheney Lake, the city’s primary water source, reached full capacity in the early hours of Thursday from 73.6 percent on July 29. Earlier this year, the lake was as low as 58 percent capacity, causing city officials to encourage conservation efforts through a media campaign, a rebate program and other measures aimed at extending the area’s water supply.

Rain Brings Needed Relief To Kansas Crops

Jul 30, 2013

A new government report shows recent rain and cooler temperatures are relieving the stress on Kansas farm crops.

The National Agricultural Statistics Service reports that producers in many areas of central Kansas saw beneficial amounts of rain in the past week.

Central Kansas had the biggest improvement in topsoil moisture, although eastern and western sections also showed some improvement. Topsoil moisture is still in short supply across 56 percent of Kansas.

Despite Recent Rains, Kansas Crops and Pastures Suffer

Jul 23, 2013

Spotty rain showers across much of the state this week were too little to improve drought conditions in western Kansas.

The National Agricultural Statistics Service reported Monday that dryland farm crops and pastures are still suffering from lack of rain. The agency said it has received reports of failed corn and sorghum crops in areas missed by the rain, as well as fields damaged by hail or wind.

The city of Wichita unveiled Thursday a $1 million rebate program to continue to encourage residents to conserve water. The program starts Monday and runs through December 31.

As Drought Drags On, Fish Species Are Disappearing

Jun 7, 2013

A Kansas State University researcher says the prolonged North American drought is taking a toll on some species of fish and affecting their long-term viability.

Biology professor Keith Gido says a few species have disappeared, including the silver chub that was once found in a southern Kansas river.

He said a survey found 300 of the fish in the summer of 2011 but only three in 2012 - and none in a sampling this spring.

r. Vore / flickr Creative Commons

Updated a 11:03 a.m.

There was a significant development this weekend with water levels at Cheney Reservoir.

Last Thursday's storm created heavy drainage into the lake, causing the level to rise from 64 percent last Thursday to 72 percent on Saturday. As of Monday morning, Cheney is up more than 13,000 acre feet of water since before the rain event last Thursday.

Drought Slows Farm Income Growth Down In First Quarter

May 16, 2013

The Federal Reserve says farm income growth slowed across the Plains and western states in the first quarter, as costs increased and the drought lingered.

Bankers expect farm income to weaken further in the region during the second quarter.

But land values continued to increase in the first quarter on top of several years of significant growth. Cropland values rose 20 percent over 2012, and ranchland values grew 14 percent.

The 10th Federal Reserve District covers Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Wyoming, Colorado, northern New Mexico and western Missouri.

Wichita Fountains Could Dry Up This Summer

May 6, 2013

A drought-induced water shortage could force Wichita officials to idle the city's fountain systems this summer.

City Manager Robert Layton says water use across all city operations is under review.

City officials say Cheney Reservoir could dry up by mid-2015 if the drought continues, and the city would no longer have enough water to meet demand if that happens.

Participants in the Kansas wheat quality tour have forecast the state will harvest 313 million bushels despite drought and freezes.

Pages