drugs

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Law enforcement officials in Sedgwick County and across Kansas will collect leftover medications on Saturday.

Since the Drug Take-Back Day program started in 2010, more than 65 tons of medication in Kansas have been collected.

Drop-off sites will be open from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. There are 10 sites in Sedgwick County, including in Maize, Goddard, Haysville, Cheney and Derby.

The event is conducted by the federal Drug Enforcement Administration, which will collect and dispose of the medications.

Harvest Public Media/File photo

Lawmakers in the Kansas House rejected an effort Monday to allow medical marijuana in the state.

But they advanced a plan to allow the sale of some products made from cannabis — if the high-producing compounds have been removed.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service

Gov. Jeff Colyer is creating a task force to study ways to fight drug abuse in Kansas through prevention and treatment. He signed an executive order Thursday bringing together the heads of 16 state agencies, as well as medical professionals and law enforcement.

Crysta Henthorne / KCUR 89.3

Junkie logic brought an addict to the doorsteps of a Topeka woman once convicted of selling cocaine.

The addict was looking to buy, and Kansas’ online database of criminal offenders has a handy geographic search tool that lets users pull up the names, crimes and addresses of people who live within a few miles of their homes.

It’s meant to boost public safety, but the Kansas Sentencing Commission says other consequences come with publishing the past transgressions of nearly 20,000 Kansans.

Lindsay Fox, flickr Creative Commons

Coleman Middle School Principal Eric Filippi says he was blind to all the different ways drugs can be concealed and the variety of forms that they can take.

“I did not think of it as something that can be put into a spray bottle and be sprayed on food,” Filippi says.

Law enforcement officers in Kansas and across the country will be collecting unused, expired and leftover medications on Saturday.

It’s an initiative called the National Drug Take-Back Day.

In Sedgwick County, officers will be staffing five locations from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for people to drop-off their unused prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

The sites include the Sedgwick County Zoo, Oaklawn Activity Center and Household Hazardous Waste center, all in Wichita, as well as the Goddard City Hall and the fire station in Cheney.

Tex Texin / flickr Creative Commons

More than 40 people have been arrested in western Kansas on various drug and weapons charges, the Kansas Bureau of Investigation announced Wednesday.

This week's arrests come in the wake of a two-month long investigation by the KBI and various law enforcement agencies in western Kansas and eastern Colorado.

At least 41 people have been taken into custody for the distribution of marijuana and methamphetamine, and for various weapons violations.

frankieleon / flickr Creative Commons

Kansans safely disposed of more than eight tons of unused medicines during last week’s National Drug Take-Back Day, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt said today.

Kansas law enforcement officers collected 16,314 pounds of medicines at more than 100 locations throughout the state during last Saturday’s event, according to a report from the federal Drug Enforcement Administration. This was the largest single-day of collection since the semi-annual program began in 2010, far surpassing the 13,894 pounds collected in April 2016.

Law enforcement officers in Kansas and across the country will be collecting unused, expired and leftover medications on Saturday.

It’s an initiative called the National Drug Take-Back Day.

The drug collection events are a way to safely dispose of leftover and expired medications to prevent accidental or intentional misuse.

Studies show a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet.

respectable_photography / flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas House has given first-round approval to a bill lowering penalties for possession of drug paraphernalia.

Republican Rep. Blaine Finch says lawmakers lowered penalties for first-time marijuana possession last year, but didn’t lower penalties for paraphernalia. That means people could face harsher sentences for possession of a pipe than for possession of marijuana.

“It does keep it at a crime. There is a potential jail sentence," he says. "It just makes it proportional with the possession of the underlying drug."

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