drugs

Wikipedia

The Kansas Bureau of Investigation is warning Kansans of a growing threat from a synthetic opioid that may have caused a number of overdose deaths in the past month.

The drug's name is U-47700 and was derived by the pharmaceutical firm Upjohn in the 1970s. The drug can be as potent as ten times that of a similar dose of morphine. The drug is not controlled in Kansas.

A bill that opponents say infringes on patient and doctor relationships will be heard in the Kansas Senate.

The practice is called step therapy, which requires patients to try older and often generic medications before doctors can prescribe newer and more expensive ones.

Senate Bill 341 would require it for KanCare recipients.

Proponents say it can save the state’s Medicaid program money, and protect patients from newer medications that might have unknown side effects.

The Kansas Board of Pharmacy wants an ingredient used in prescription cough syrup to be tracked by the state because it’s being abused.

Debra Billingsley is executive secretary of the board of pharmacy, she told lawmakers Monday that promethazine with codeine syrup is being increasingly abused as a recreational drug, particularly by high school students. She says when it’s mixed with soda or candy the mixture is often called by several slang names, including "purple drank" and "sizzurp."

The rate of drug overdose deaths in Kansas has more than doubled since 1999, but the rate has gone up even more in many other states.

As a result, Kansas now has the eighth-lowest drug overdose mortality rate in the country, according to a new report from the non-profit Trust for America’s Health.

Drug Take-Back Nets Record Haul

May 1, 2013

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt says Kansas residents turned in a record amount of unused medications in the National Drug Take-Back Day.