economy

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media/File photo

The farm economy is showing some stability, the U.S. Department of Agriculture says, but the upswing doesn’t extend to all agricultural sectors.

J. Schafer / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

new estimate from the Emporia State Economic Index shows Kansas’ economy started to level off in October. 

The GDP for the state shrank slightly by 0.1 percent from September. That follows months of strong growth after a low point in March. There is some positive news: Kansas' GDP grew 1.7 percent since October 2016.

An economic expert says changes to the international trading system could slow down manufacturing exports in the Wichita area.

Jeremy Hill  is the director of the Center for Economic Development and Business Research at Wichita State. He released the 2018 employment forecast earlier this month.

Hill says despite a growing global economy government trade policies and restrictions could impact exports.

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The employment forecast for the Wichita area shows little to no job growth in 2018.

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A monthly survey of business leaders suggests that in Kansas and other Midwestern and Great Plains states, business conditions worsened slightly in July, but should improve.

The Mid-America Business Conditions Index dipped by 6 points in July, falling to 56.6. Overall, the survey's index range is from 0 to 100; an index greater than 50 indicates an expanding economy.

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A report out of Creighton University reveals that the Kansas economy is showing growth, but lagging behind in a nine-state region.

The forecasting group’s overall index ranges between 0 and 100. An index greater than 50 means an expanding economy. Kansas received a 56 index for April, an increase from 52 in March. Four states received a 61 index, with South Dakota receiving the region's high of 69.

Creighton University economics professor Ernie Goss, who oversees the report, says Kansas is growing, but at a slower rate than the rest of the region.

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Our Kansas elections coverage team is taking questions (submit yours here). 

One question that seems to come up almost every election season is why people sometimes vote against their own best interests -- specifically their economic interests.

Diane Wahto of Wichita asked it this way:

“Why do Kansans often vote against their best interests? ... When we don't have money to fix the highways or fund social programs, who cares about those other things?”

Chris Murphy, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas secretary of state's office issued a report today on the status of business growth in the state. There were signs of growth--and signs of decline.

Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s office noted that a record of nearly 17,300 businesses formed in Kansas last year. His office reported that Kansas had about 179,000 businesses at the end of 2015, roughly 8,600 more than at the end of 2014.

Those new ventures helped fuel the state’s overall business growth in 2015, which was up 5 percent.

Report: Midwest Economy Continues To Struggle

Jan 4, 2016
Pictures of Money, flickr Creative Commons

A regional economic report out of Creighton University indicates that December of 2015 continued a sluggish trend for Kansas’ economy.

The report surveys supply managers and business leaders in a nine-state region, including Kansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota.

The Kansas Business Conditions Index for December dropped to 41.7 from November’s 42.6. On a scale of 0-100, scores below 50 are considered a slow-growth economy.

Kansas' Economy Not Growing As Quickly As Nation's

Sep 27, 2013

Researchers at The Center for Economic Development and Business Research at Wichita State University say the Kansas economy is growing at a slower rate than the nation as a whole.

Their report says the number of jobs in the state has grown one percent so far this year and isn't keeping up with the growth of the labor force. The jobless rate in Kansas rose to 5.9 percent in August.

The largest growth forecast for 2014 is expected to be in the service sectors. Education and health services are expected to add more than 4,200 jobs.

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