Education

Larry Darling, flickr Creative Commons

Starting Monday, parents can go online to enroll their children in Wichita Public Schools using a computer, smartphone or tablet.

Returning students in USD 259 can be enrolled using an active account with the district’s web portal, ParentVUE. Enrollment forms, class schedules, information on district policies, and waivers are also available online. Parents can also pay for school meals and take care of enrollment fees through the web portal.

Stephen Koranda, File Photo / Kansas Public Radio

The Kansas Supreme Court has set arguments for September in an ongoing lawsuit over school funding. At issue is whether the state is spending enough on schools.

Republican leaders in the Legislature call the timing of the arguments political, because they’ll take place not long before the fall election. House Speaker Ray Merrick says it’s an effort to direct attention away from retention elections for the justices.

“The timing of the scheduled arguments yet again demonstrates the court’s desperate political motivations,” Merrick says.

Wichita Public Schools

Updated: Kansas schools will be able to keep their doors open and the threat of a potential statewide shutdown is over. The Kansas Supreme Court has ruled that a bill passed by lawmakers last Friday and signed by Governor Sam Brownback on Monday, fixes inequities in school funding between rich and poor districts.

Now, the court will move on to the larger question of whether the Legislature is providing adequate funding to schools, which officials say could involve hundreds of millions of dollars. A date for those arguments has not been set.

wichita.edu

Eric Sexton, vice president for student affairs at Wichita State University, is stepping down.

Sexton announced his resignation Tuesday, a little more than a year after taking over the position. It will go into effect mid-July.

“It is time for me to change the trajectory of my professional life,” Sexton said in his resignation letter. “I want to sincerely thank the countless students, faculty, staff and alumni who have helped me. I will always be a Shocker.”

Sean Sandefur / KMUW

Kansas is one of 46 states that have been receiving significant amounts of money each year from tobacco settlements. Nearly 20 years ago, when the settlement was decided, states were encouraged to use the money for cessation programs and tobacco-related health care costs. In Kansas, the money is funneled into an early childhood education endowment. But the programs that rely on this funding are worried that their ability to serve the community will be in jeopardy if large amounts of the settlement money continues to be diverted to the state’s general fund.

https://www.kansasregents.org/index.cfm

Tuition costs for university students in Kansas will be going up in the fall. The Kansas Board of Regents has approved increases of up to 6 percent for undergraduate, in-state tuition.

The universities in Kansas say the increases are justified by state budget cuts, rising costs and the need to retain and attract staff. Board of Regents Chair Shane Bangerter has concerns about universities staying competitive in the state’s tough budget situation.

Christopher Sessums / flickr Creative Commons

Services for students with disabilities are among the many things Kansas education officials must solve amid the potential threat of school closures on July 1.

The state's Supreme Court ruled last month that the Legislature failed to adequately fund the state's poor public schools and gave the lawmakers until June 30 to address the issue. While many districts have cash reserves, the court's opinion said that without an acceptable state funding system, schools "will be unable to operate."

Courtesy / Wichita State University

Wichita State University is asking its faculty and staff for ways to save money and increase outside funding for their departments. The school has experienced funding cuts from the state.

Abigail Wilson / KMUW

Members of the local teachers union and some elected officials from Wichita gathered at a rally on Tuesday to urge state lawmakers to address inequities in school funding.

Teachers and parents held signs criticizing the inaction of state lawmakers. Children in purple t-shirts stood with signs reading “I need my summer program.”

The Kansas Supreme Court has threatened to close schools if legislators don’t fix education funding by June 30. But when the legislative session ended, the issue wasn’t addressed.

Abigail Wilson / KMUW

Members of the Wichita Public Schools Board of Education have adopted a calendar change approved by the local teacher's union last month.

The overall school day will be 30 minutes longer, and the school year will be 15 days shorter for students in the district.The change trims about $3 million from next year's budget.

Betty Arnold, president of the local board of education, says the new calendar was one of two options proposed to reduce costs for next year.

Pages