Education

Alex Starr, flickr Creative Commons

Attorney General Derek Schmidt says a law signed by Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback last week satisfies the state's constitutional duty to provide equitable funding to public schools.

The Topeka Capital-Journal reports Schmidt filed a brief with the state Supreme Court on Friday urging it to withdraw its threat to close the state's schools.

Wright Career College Facebook

Wright Career College closed its campuses in three states today, including one in Wichita and another in Overland Park.

The Overland Park-based nonprofit filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy. The college reportedly sent an email to students Thursday night about the closure, telling them Wright Career College is no longer able to continue operations, and that other schools will accept credits accumulated.

In recent weeks it had stopped accepting new students. The school largely trains students for jobs as medical assistants, accountants and other business occupations.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

The Kansas Supreme Court will hear arguments next month in a school funding lawsuit. At issue is whether Kansas lawmakers have complied with a previous ruling that says funding disparities need to be reduced.

Republican House Speaker Ray Merrick says he isn’t planning on waiting for the ruling before ending the session. He believes legislators helped reduce disparities when they redistributed school funding.

“I think we’ve done our job. I think it’s a good bill. Is equity ever going to be solved? I don’t think you can ever solve equity,” Merrick says.

Wade Morgen / flick Creative Commons

On Monday night, the Wichita School Board approved an expense of up to $2 million to update the district's cyber security. Representatives from USD 259 say steps are being taken to keep its computer network safe after an attempted hack of the district-wide system last year.

Alex Starr, flickr Creative Commons

The back-and-forth discussion about school funding in the state of Kansas has been, without a doubt, confusing. Last week, Gov. Sam Brownback signed a bill that lawmakers hope will fix a major problem in education financing. But how could that bill affect students in Wichita? And what does it mean for the future of education funding in Kansas?

Alberto G., flickr Creative Commons

Standardizing testing is on hold in more than a dozen states because of Internet problems at the University of Kansas where the test developer is based.

The university's Center for Educational Testing and Evaluation provides general end-of-year assessments for students in Kansas and Alaska. It also offers testing for students with significant cognitive disabilities in those states and 14 others Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Utah, Vermont, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

USD 266

The Maize School District is breaking ground today on the first in a series of projects funded by a $70.7 million bond issue that voters approved last June.

The bond is the largest and most extensive measure the Maize community has ever passed for USD 266. District-wide improvements include the addition of tornado-safe rooms at Maize High School and a new transportation facility.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW

A group of high school students from the Wichita School District gathered today to offer feedback on the Board of Education’s suggested budget cuts.

Wichita Public Schools is considering 55 different cuts it could make in order to balance the budget and close an expected $16 million to $30 million shortfall.

Wichita Public Schools Superintendent John Allison says this is not the dialogue he would like to be having at this point in the year.

Chris, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Senate has passed legislation that would require teachers to vote every three years in order to maintain their local union.

The Topeka Capital-Journal reports that the bill passed the chamber with a 22-18 vote after more than two hours of debate Wednesday.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Kansas lawmakers are considering a new education funding plan that school districts are both praising and criticizing. The proposal shifts money between districts to reduce funding disparities. It also moves some money from another fund to make sure no district loses overall state support. Shawnee Mission School District Superintendent Jim Hinson appreciates that no districts would lose out.

“This bill allows us to have stability during very uncertain financial times, which is extremely important for us,” Hinson says.

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