education

File Photo / Kansas News Service

Fewer than 40 percent of Kansas students are on track to be academically prepared for college, community college or technical school as measured by their scores on the state’s standardized math and English tests.

Lydia Liu

Kansas has received a federal grant worth $27 million to promote student literacy in schools across the state.

The grant is part of the U.S. Department of Education’s “Striving Reader Comprehensive Literacy Initiative,” which works to build literacy skills from birth through 12th grade. The program focuses in particular on English Language Learners and students with disabilities.

Hugo Phan / KMUW

The Voter Empowerment Committee held a political forum on Sunday with candidates running for Wichita City Council and the USD 259 School Board.

The forum gave voters a chance to meet and hear from candidates ahead of the election in November.

Sam Zeff / Kansas News Service

The massive hurricanes Harvey and Irma have people talking about how much, if at all, climate change adds to such storms’ destructiveness.

In a blog post authored by Paul Driessen, the conservative Heartland Institute disputes that global warming is worsening the weather or that it’s human-caused. And, Driessen writes, fossil fuels “bring rescue boats.”

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos touted the importance of making higher education accessible Thursday while on a whirlwind tour of vocational classrooms at Johnson County Community College.

Sam Zeff / KCUR

Despite the ongoing fight over how much Kansas should spend on schools, the Legislature did at least one thing this year that almost all educators were pleased with: For the first time, it included all-day kindergarten in the school funding formula.

That means districts no longer have to use money from other parts of their budgets or charge parents for all-day K.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

Kansas is setting aspirations for much higher math and reading competency among the class of 2030 — today’s kindergartners — in a long-term accountability plan for its public schools.

Kansas officials submitted the accountability blueprint Tuesday to the U.S. Department of Education. It does not include language promoting controversial school choice concepts that Gov. Sam Brownback’s office advocated for, according to staff at the state education department.

Alberto G. / flickr Creative Commons

The results of the state's latest ACT test shows the number of Kansas students who are college-ready is on the decline.

Alberto G. / flickr Creative Commons

Kansas education officials are aiming for big improvements in academic outcomes by 2030.

State officials want a 95 percent high school graduation rate. The current rate is 86 percent. And they want even steeper gains in math and reading proficiency.

The Kansas Association of School Boards supports these goals but warns no state has achieved them, and to get there schools will need more resources.

WLADYSLAW / WIKIMEDIA-CC

Kansas’ private tuition tax credit program doubled in size during the 2016-17 school year and appears likely to expand again after lawmakers voted to enhance it this session.

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