education

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

Tenure, as Kansas public school teachers had known it for decades, died at the hands of lawmakers without a hearing in the spring of 2014.

No one disputes that.

On Wednesday, state and teachers union lawyers went head-to-head before the Kansas Supreme Court over whether the ending of those long-standing job protections ran afoul of the state and U.S. constitutions.

Jimmy Wayne, flickr Creative Commons

The University of Kansas continues to lead the state's six public universities in the rate of students graduating in four years.

The Lawrence Journal-World reports a report earlier this month to the Board of Regents found Kansas had a 41.1 percent four-year graduation rate in the reporting year of 2016. The data comes from the National Center for Education Statistics.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

The U.S. Department of Education has thrown its weight behind a Kansas school plan that aims for much higher rates of math and reading proficiency by 2030.

Initial feedback from the federal agency on Kansas’ 90-page blueprint for closing achievement gaps had been lackluster, forcing the state to revise it.

stacey_newman / Getty Images/iStockphoto

Kansas' former education commissioner is hoping to bridge the divide between how schools teach and what businesses need from their workers.

The Topeka Capital-Journal reports that Diane DeBacker was appointed late last year to the new executive director of business and education innovation position at the Kansas Department of Commerce. Her job is meant to bring education voices into the department.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

Kansas lawmakers are facing an even tighter deadline to pass a new school finance law this session, after an attorney for the state encouraged them to finish their work on the topic less than two months into the coming 2018 legislative session.

Asked Monday by lawmakers what legal staff need to help make the state’s case, Arthur Chalmers urged them to aim for the start of March for handing off a new school finance bill rather than sometime closer to the date the Kansas Supreme Court set for filing the state’s arguments.

Courtesy photo

Lt. Gov. Jeff Colyer continues to shape top levels of Kansas government amid anticipation that the U.S. Senate may soon confirm Gov. Sam Brownback for an ambassadorship at the State Department.

Josh Harbour / Garden City Telegram

Children who come from low-income families, have disabilities, aren’t white or don’t speak English at home appear to be disproportionately paying the price of Kansas’ teacher shortage, according to an analysis by the Kansas News Service.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A special Kansas legislative committee on public school funding is having its first meeting next month to start work on a response to a state Supreme Court order to boost funding.

The committee is scheduled to convene Dec. 4 at the Statehouse.

The Supreme Court ruled in October that state aid to public schools remains constitutionally inadequate even with a new law phasing in a $293 million increase over two years to make it $4.3 billion annually. The court directed lawmakers to enact a new law before July.

File Photo / Kansas News Service

The top education official in Kansas on Tuesday proposed allowing more schools to hire educators who don’t qualify for teaching licenses under the state’s current system — and signaled he would support changes to state regulations if needed.

Flazingo Photos / Flickr, Creative Commons

Applications are being accepted to fill an open seat on Wichita's Board of Education.

Barbara Fuller resigned last week due to moving out of District 3, which includes large portions of southeast Wichita.

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