education funding

J. Schafer / KPR

You couldn't have gotten a more different picture of school finance and student success in Kansas than what was heard during two hours of oral arguments Wednesday in the state Supreme Court.

J. Stephen Conn, flickr Creative Commons

A majority of the Kansas Supreme Court's justices were openly skeptical Wednesday of the cash-strapped state's arguments that legislators are spending enough money on public schools to provide a suitable education to every child.

But Justice Dan Biles also suggested that if the court concludes that inadequate funding has allowed some children to fall behind, its order might have to be targeted to helping just them allowing the state to potentially shift funds from programs for gifted students.

The Kansas Supreme Court will hear two hours of oral arguments Wednesday in the Gannon school funding case.

It's hard to imagine an educator, lawmaker or legislative candidate not sitting on the edge of their seat looking for a clue as to how the justices will rule.

Here are some FAQs on the hearing:

So you're telling me the case is still going? Didn't we just have a big Gannon story not long ago?

Christopher Sessums / flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday in the latest lawsuit over school funding. At issue is whether the state is spending enough on schools.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Last month, Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback asked for help on how what should be in a new school funding formula. On Thursday, he got some pretty vague suggestions from the state school board association.

Kansas lawmakers threw out the old funding formula last year and legislators will work on a new plan next year. Brownback offered no specifics when he sent a letter around two weeks ago asking for suggestions.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Gov. Sam Brownback announced Wednesday that he has reached out to Kansas school districts, boards of education and various education associations asking for input on the state's school funding system.

Gage Skidmore, flickr Creative Commons

Gov. Sam Brownback is reaching out to education leaders to discuss the development of a new education funding strategy. He plans to host a press conference on the subject on Wednesday afternoon.

In a release from the governor's office, Brownback says he will be announcing a plan for developing a funding system that ensures high-quality education for Kansas students. So far, that plan is to engage the members of the education community, including Jim McNiece, the chairman of the Kansas State Board of Education, and Dr. Randall Watson, the Kansas Commissioner of Education.

Stephen Koranda, File Photo

A temporary block grant system for education in Kansas is set to expire next year and lawmakers are planning to write a new school funding formula to replace it. How much money a new formula provides per student could be one of the major issues of contention.

Mark Tallman, with the Kansas Association of School Boards, says Kansas does well on most education measures, but his group is studying the states that perform even better.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

A federal lawsuit challenging Kansas’ school funding system has been dismissed.

Petrella v. Brownback was filed in 2010 by a group of parents and students in the Shawnee Mission School District who argued that a state limit on local authorities to raise and spend money on local schools violated the U.S. Constitution.

Julia Szabo / KCUR/File photo

The number of teachers leaving Kansas or simply quitting the profession has dramatically increased over the last four years.

The annual Licensed Personnel Report was released Tuesday by the Kansas Department of Education. While it was provided to the Board of Education meeting in Topeka, the report was buried in board documents and not addressed by either staff or the board.

The report shows that 1,075 teachers left the profession last year, up from 669 four years ago. That's a 61 percent increase.

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