education funding

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Gov. Sam Brownback announced Wednesday that he has reached out to Kansas school districts, boards of education and various education associations asking for input on the state's school funding system.

Gage Skidmore, flickr Creative Commons

Gov. Sam Brownback is reaching out to education leaders to discuss the development of a new education funding strategy. He plans to host a press conference on the subject on Wednesday afternoon.

In a release from the governor's office, Brownback says he will be announcing a plan for developing a funding system that ensures high-quality education for Kansas students. So far, that plan is to engage the members of the education community, including Jim McNiece, the chairman of the Kansas State Board of Education, and Dr. Randall Watson, the Kansas Commissioner of Education.

Stephen Koranda, File Photo

A temporary block grant system for education in Kansas is set to expire next year and lawmakers are planning to write a new school funding formula to replace it. How much money a new formula provides per student could be one of the major issues of contention.

Mark Tallman, with the Kansas Association of School Boards, says Kansas does well on most education measures, but his group is studying the states that perform even better.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

A federal lawsuit challenging Kansas’ school funding system has been dismissed.

Petrella v. Brownback was filed in 2010 by a group of parents and students in the Shawnee Mission School District who argued that a state limit on local authorities to raise and spend money on local schools violated the U.S. Constitution.

Julia Szabo / KCUR/File photo

The number of teachers leaving Kansas or simply quitting the profession has dramatically increased over the last four years.

The annual Licensed Personnel Report was released Tuesday by the Kansas Department of Education. While it was provided to the Board of Education meeting in Topeka, the report was buried in board documents and not addressed by either staff or the board.

The report shows that 1,075 teachers left the profession last year, up from 669 four years ago. That's a 61 percent increase.

Alex Starr, flickr Creative Commons

A final vote on the proposed budget for Wichita Public Schools has been scheduled for Aug. 22. Members of the local school board looked over the budget at a meeting on Monday night.

The plan, which totals nearly $662 million, cuts certain expenses by about $22 million to account for the increased costs for healthcare, transportation and utilities.

The Kansas Board of Education has approved more than $7 million in additional funding for 34 school districts, but there’s a catch. As Stephen Koranda reports, the money might never materialize.

The block grant funding system in Kansas doesn’t take into account things like student enrollment growth, but it lets officials like Basehor-Linwood Superintendent David Howard ask for more money to cover new students.

“This isn’t just teachers. We’re actually having to add bus routes and equip new classrooms. That’s part of that total request,” Howard said.

Schools around Kansas are just a couple of weeks from opening for the new school year, but about three dozen districts say they need more state aid and have applied for extraordinary needs funding.

In all, 37 districts are asking for about $8.4 million from the state Board of Education. There is about $15 million in the pool. All districts contribute a small portion of their state aid to the pool.

Two of the biggest requests come from the two of the smaller districts in this area: Spring Hill in Johnson County and Basehor-Linwood in Leavenworth County. 

Stephen Koranda, File Photo / Kansas Public Radio

The Kansas Supreme Court has set arguments for September in an ongoing lawsuit over school funding. At issue is whether the state is spending enough on schools.

Republican leaders in the Legislature call the timing of the arguments political, because they’ll take place not long before the fall election. House Speaker Ray Merrick says it’s an effort to direct attention away from retention elections for the justices.

“The timing of the scheduled arguments yet again demonstrates the court’s desperate political motivations,” Merrick says.

Abigail Wilson / KMUW

To say that many educators in Kansas are fed up with state lawmakers would be an understatement. The state Legislature has been putting a tighter and tighter squeeze on public schools in recent years, and this election season, educators are trying to send legislators packing.

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