elections

Carla Eckels

A lawsuit over voter registration in Kansas will likely continue, but some state election officials are getting prepared in case they need to make policy changes.

Updated on 05/01/16:

Kansas Democrats held a convention in Topeka Saturday to pick the remaining delegates pledged to Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. But they’re more concerned about elections closer to home.

When state Rep. Jim Ward stood up to give his pitch to the committee that elected him as a Clinton delegate, he looked out at what he saw as potential candidates for the Kansas Legislature.

Hugo Phan, File Photo / KMUW

Congressman Mike Pompeo officially launched his re-election bid on Monday for Kansas’ 4th District.

As KMUW’s Deborah Shaar reports, the House Republican decided against making a run for the U.S. Senate.

Carla Eckels / KMUW

Dozens of young adults took part in a civic engagement workshop in Wichita last week. They listened to their peers in the Republican and Democratic parties. The workshop, put together by Wichita Urban Professionals and Young Professionals of Wichita, was part of an effort to educate millennials and to get them involved in the political process.


Cody Newill / KCUR

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders rallied thousands of supporters in Kansas City today. As KCUR’s Frank Morris reports, the Democratic primary candidate made a lot of campaign promises.

Sanders says the financial system is rigged against working people, and that Wall Street is running Washington. He promises major changes: more uniform wealth distribution, lower poverty levels, universal health care, college loan debt relief, gun control, and judicial reform, to name a few.

donkeyhotey / Flickr / Creative Commons

Kansas hasn’t held a presidential primary election since 1992. State officials say the estimated $2 million price tag is just too high. Instead, Republicans and Democrats across the state gather in convention centers, schools and churches for caucuses. Ahead of the March 5 caucuses, KMUW’s Sean Sandefur explains how this complicated system works.

Carla Eckels / KMUW

The Sedgwick County Election Office hosted a public demonstration today prospective of new voting equipment that will replace current election machines.

The current voting machines have been in use for 10 years and for security purposes need to be upgraded to newer technology. But Sedgwick County Election Commissioner Tabitha Lehman says the new machines won’t be be put into use until 2017.

Sedgwickcounty.org

The state political parties in Kansas are beginning to gear up for the 2016 election, but party leaders are focused on different strategies right now. Stephen Koranda reports on how they’re approaching Statehouse races.

Republicans have big majorities in the Kansas Legislature. State GOP Executive Director Clay Barker says that means they’re right now targeting areas where they’ll face a close race or could pick up a seat.

Becky McCray, flickr Creative Commons

An earlier version of this piece aired August 4, 2015, during All Things Considered.

There’s more than a year before the 2016 election, but some races in the Kansas Statehouse are starting to take shape. Just this week, Wichita school board member Lynn Rogers decided to challenge sitting Republican state Sen. Michael O’Donnell. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, that’s just one of several challengers taking on incumbent state senators.

Mel Green, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback is preparing to sign bills to change the timing of many local elections and to give the secretary of state the power to prosecute election fraud cases.

Brownback was having a signing ceremony Monday at the Statehouse.

One bill moves city and local school board elections from the spring to the fall of odd-numbered years. Supporters contend the change will boost turnout.

Critics say the change will be disruptive and that there are other ways to increase voter participation, including voting by mail.

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