Government

Stephen Koranda file photo / KPR

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback says his administration will unveil $50 million in state budget cuts this week. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, those cuts are required as part of a bill passed in the Legislature this year.

neetalparekh, flickr Creative Commons

State laws requiring labels on food containing genetically modified ingredients would be banned under a bill passed in the U.S. House Thursday.

The bill’s sponsor is Kansas Republican Mike Pompeo. He says genetically engineered foods are safe and if someone doesn’t want to eat them, they can choose products voluntarily labeled GMO-free.

Stephen Koranda file photo

Gov. Sam Brownback expects to outline spending cuts next week to help prevent Kansas from having a deficit within the next year, his top spokeswoman said Friday, as his office announced expanded duties for his top budget adviser.

Storem, flickr Creative Commons

TOPEKA, Kan.--The Kansas attorney general's office says it received 9,805 applications for concealed gun permits for the fiscal year ending June 30.

Attorney General Derek Schmidt said in a news release Tuesday that he expects the program to remain popular even with the law passed by the Legislature this year allowing eligible Kansans to carry concealed guns without a license.

Deborah Shaar

The city of Wichita is confirming its commitment to Project Access, one day after Sedgwick County recommended eliminating its funding for the nonprofit.

City Council members on Tuesday unanimously approved $175,000 in funding for Project Access for next year. It’s the amount the group requested and the same level of funding it received from the city this year.

Sean Sandefur file photo

TOPEKA, Kan.--Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback's campaign approached a Westar Energy official for a campaign debt donation while the utility is in the process of seeking a rate increase, a newspaper reported.

Sedgwickcounty.org

Sedgwick County has released its proposed budget for 2016, and it includes drastic cuts to many county services.

 

Numerous county agencies and county-supported organizations were aware that funding cuts were coming, but didn’t know how severe they’d be.

Dave Ranney, Heartland Health Monitor

Douglas County District Court Judge Peggy Carr Kittel is raising questions about possible changes to the state’s foster care program. As Heartland Health Monitor’s Jim McLean reports, the judge is concerned the state may soon require foster-care couples to be married.

Judge Kittel outlined her concerns in a letter to officials at the Kansas Department of Children and Families. She says requiring all couples providing foster to marry would reduce the number of foster homes at a time when there are near record numbers of children in the system.

http://centralplainshealthcarepartnership.org

The Sedgwick County Commissioners voted Wednesday to restore some of the funding they cut from Project Access earlier this year.

The nonprofit coordinates donated medical care for uninsured patients.

The county will provide an additional $25,000 to Project Access this year, bringing the county’s contribution to the program up to $200,000.

In January, the commissioners unexpectedly cut the program’s funding, even though it was already approved in the county’s budget.

Amy Delamaide, flickr Creative Commons

The Wichita City Council is holding annual budget talks, and while officials have been happy to announce that the budget is balanced and few cuts have been made, the future of the city’s bus system is still undecided. 

 

City Manager Robert Layton presented the 2016-2017 proposed budget to City Council members Tuesday morning.

Pages