gun laws

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The debate over allowing concealed guns on college campuses is starting to heat up in the Kansas Statehouse.

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In addition to the budget, income taxes and education, Kansas lawmakers will also debate whether to roll back some gun legislation.

As Sam Zeff with the Kansas News Service reports, a bill to do just that has already been filed.

The pre-filed measure would negate a law from two years ago that allows anyone to carry a concealed gun in the Statehouse. The capitol is secured by metal detectors and highway patrol troopers.

The lone sponsor of the legislation is Democratic Rep. Louis Ruiz from Kansas City, Kansas.

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Sedgwick County Commissioners voted Wednesday to build a gun locker inside the county courthouse for visitors to store their weapons.

Kansas law allows the concealed carry of firearms, but guns aren’t allowed in the Sedgwick County Courthouse--except for by law enforcement.

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A batch of new laws passed by Kansas lawmakers during the last legislative session go into effect tomorrow, July 1.

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Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback has signed into law a bill allowing many public employees to carry concealed weapons when they’re traveling on the job. The change means employees for cities, counties and government agencies can now carry guns when they’re working out in the community.

During debate earlier this month, Republican Sen. Forrest Knox said this allows workers to protect themselves.

“You should not, if you’re a public entity, a public employer, be able to require your employees to be defenseless,” Knox says.

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Kansas colleges and universities are preparing for the summer of 2017. That's when they will have to start allowing students, staff and faculty members to carry concealed guns on campus.

Schools can opt out of this policy, but only if they spend millions of dollars to upgrade security measures.

One survey showed a majority of university employees opposed the idea of allowing guns on campus.

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Democrats in the Kansas Legislature have introduced a bill that would allow colleges and universities to continue banning concealed guns on campus. State law allows concealed firearms in most public buildings that don't have adequate security measures in place.

Universities have been exempt from that law but the exemption expires next year. This new proposal would give universities a permanent exemption. Democratic Senator Tom Holland says the state shouldn’t be dictating these policies.

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President Obama's plan to reduce gun violence includes providing active shooter training for law enforcement authorities, first responders and school officials.

This type of training is already happening in Kansas through several agencies, including the Kansas Highway Patrol.

The Highway Patrol launched the Kansas Active Shooter Mitigation (KASM) program in 2013.

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Some university officials in Kansas could be making a push next legislative session to keep concealed guns off college campuses, but Gov. Sam Brownback does not seem interested in changing the law.

Universities currently have an exemption to state law allowing them to ban concealed weapons, but that will end in 2017. In a recent interview, Brownback said constitutional rights extend onto college campuses.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Concealed weapons will be allowed on university campuses in Kansas starting in 2017 as required by a state law. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, more than 100 students, faculty and staff gathered yesterday at the University of Kansas to share their thoughts and concerns about the issue.

Miranda Ganter, a sophomore at KU and an RA, says she’s already scared sometimes when she has to confront men in the dorms who are drinking or otherwise breaking the rules.

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