gun laws

Kansas News Service/File photo

A Kansas bill that would make it a crime for people recently convicted of a misdemeanor domestic violence offense to have a firearm has stalled in the state Senate.

The bill unanimously passed the House last month but has stalled after the Senate's Federal and State Affairs Committee amended language regarding silencers and throwing stars, The Kansas City Star reported.

File Photo /

Listening to news reports while driving to the Statehouse on the day after the deadly high school shooting in Florida, Kansas Sen. Barbara Bollier decided to redouble her efforts to put a “red flag” law on the books in Kansas.

She wants a system for temporarily confiscating guns from people deemed a risk to themselves or others.

“It’s not something that tramples on somebody’s rights,” said Bollier, a Mission Hills Republican. “It just puts a temporary hold on a situation until things calm down.”

Wichita East High School / Facebook

Alayna Nelson, a sophomore at Wichita Northwest High School, grew up hearing stories of repeated mass shootings on the news.

“Every single time this happened I always wanted to do something about it,” Nelson said.

Now, Nelson and other students in her generation are taking action against gun violence.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas lawmakers have rejected an effort to repeal a law that allows people to carry concealed firearms in most facilities at public colleges and universities in the state.

The Lawrence Journal-World reports that the Kansas House voted 53-69 against Democratic Rep. Barbara Ballard's repeal amendment Thursday.

Storem / flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas House advanced a bill that will allow people as young as 18 to carry concealed weapons.

Currently only those 21 and older can carry concealed weapons. The new law would require those between 18 and 21 to get a gun permit, which is not required after age 21.

The bill advanced Thursday by a vote of 85-35 and could come to a final vote Friday.

Storem / flickr Creative Commons

The start of July means the start of two new policies that affect students and employees at Wichita State University.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

It took 113 days instead of the scheduled 100, but Kansas lawmakers finally ended their 2017 session Saturday.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

Kansas lawmakers sent Gov. Sam Brownback a bill that would allow public health care facilities to continue banning concealed guns. The bill landed on his desk Monday, but Brownback is saying little about what action he might take.

Under state law, most public places must allow concealed weapons by this summer or install security to keep all guns out.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Updated Thursday, 8:50 p.m.

The Kansas Senate and House have voted to allow public health care facilities to continue banning concealed weapons. The 24-16 Senate vote and 91-33 House vote send the plan to Gov. Sam Brownback for consideration.

State law requires most public places to allow concealed firearms by this summer or install security at entrances to keep weapons out. Health care facilities have an exemption that ends later this year.

A Kansas gun-rights group is rallying members ahead of a possible legislative debate over a measure aimed at keeping concealed weapons out of public hospitals.

The Kansas State Rifle Association sent an email to members and supporters ahead of a scheduled Senate debate Thursday.