gun laws

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Updated Thursday, 8:50 p.m.

The Kansas Senate and House have voted to allow public health care facilities to continue banning concealed weapons. The 24-16 Senate vote and 91-33 House vote send the plan to Gov. Sam Brownback for consideration.

State law requires most public places to allow concealed firearms by this summer or install security at entrances to keep weapons out. Health care facilities have an exemption that ends later this year.

ksraweb.net

A Kansas gun-rights group is rallying members ahead of a possible legislative debate over a measure aimed at keeping concealed weapons out of public hospitals.

The Kansas State Rifle Association sent an email to members and supporters ahead of a scheduled Senate debate Thursday.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Negotiations appear to have stalled over a proposal in the Kansas Legislature aimed at keeping concealed guns out of public hospitals and other health care facilities.

The talks Tuesday involved the National Rifle Association and the University of Kansas Health System and the university's Kansas City, Kansas, teaching hospital.

The Senate postponed a debate on the bill to see whether talks bore fruit. Multiple sources said they had not.

Hugo Phan / KMUW/File photo

Lawmakers will try again to exempt some facilities from the state’s concealed carry law.

The Senate Ways and Means Committee on Tuesday advanced a bill that would allow public health care facilities to ban concealed guns. State law states most public places must allow concealed firearms by this summer or install security at entrances to keep weapons out.

Some buildings, including universities and public health care facilities, have an exemption from the law that expires this summer. That means they'll either have to allow guns or install more security.

Lawmakers in the Kansas House have twice rejected efforts to hold a debate on the issue of concealed weapons in public buildings, but the issue could keep popping up.

Meg Wingerter / Kansas News Service/File photo

Costs to secure four state-run hospitals under Kansas’ concealed carry law could run close to $12 million annually, with an additional $1 million needed in the first months, according to a new “action plan” from state officials.

JOHNSON COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE / YOUTUBE

Kansas universities and community colleges have been working for years getting ready to allow campus concealed carry.

Unless the Legislature rolls the change back, and that appears unlikely, Johnson County and every other state school will have to allow almost anyone older than 21 to carry a pistol on campus on July 1.

To try to spread accurate information to faculty, staff and students, Johnson County Community College has moved to YouTube to spread information.

Meg Wingerter / Kansas News Service/File photo

Lawmakers signaled Thursday that they could exempt Kansas psychiatric hospitals from a law requiring them to allow concealed handguns.

Gov. Sam Brownback has requested an additional $24 million in spending over the next two budget years on upgrades needed to provide security at state mental health hospitals and facilities for people with developmental disabilities.

Hugo Phan / KMUW/File photo

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback is proposing an additional $24 million in spending over two years on extra security measures to keep concealed guns out of state hospitals.

The Republican governor unveiled the proposal Thursday among other budget measures he recommended to the House and Senate budget committees.

A 2013 law will require hospitals to allow people to bring in concealed guns starting July 1 unless the buildings have extra security such as metal detectors and guards. Some lawmakers want to change the law banning concealed weapons at hospitals.

Wikipedia

Starting in August, KU Athletics is banning all purses from football, men’s and women’s basketball, volleyball games and other major sporting events.

If it’s larger than a typical clutch bag and opaque, it won’t be allowed into big games.

Anything else Jayhawk fans carry will have to be in a clear plastic bag no larger than 12-by-12.

Athletics spokesman Jim Marchiony says the policy will not only make the events safer but should expedite entry.

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