gun laws

A legislative committee is considering a bill that would bar local governments in Kansas from passing any rules that restrict the open carry of firearms. It would also invalidate any local rules currently restricting open carry.

Representative Jim Howell, a Derby Republican, says the goal is to create consistency.

“So what this does, it just simply says we’re not going to let cities create a patchwork of laws, so that people can exercise their Second Amendment rights confidently, understanding the law, with simplicity," Howell says.

Kansas legislators are considering new gun-rights proposals.

The bill would strip cities and counties of any power to regulate guns, as well as limit local programs to buy guns back from their owners.

The House Federal and State Affairs Committee scheduled a hearing this morning on a sweeping bill containing the new measures.

The bill would keep cities and counties from enacting bans on the open carrying of firearms and prevent them from spending tax dollars to administer firearms buyback programs.

The Kansas Attorney General's office has received notifications from more than 300 local governments stating that they're exempting themselves from a new state gun law.

Attorney General Derek Schmidt says counties and cities that exempt themselves from a new law on concealed weapons need to change any "No Guns" signs on public buildings.

The law, which takes effect Monday, allows people with concealed-carry permits to bring their guns into public buildings that don't have adequate security, such as screening.

Many cities and counties have taken advantage of a provision letting them exempt their buildings for six months.

On April 26, US Attorney General Eric Holder sent a letter to Gov. Sam Brownback that states the new Kansas law attempting to block federal regulation of some guns is unconstitutional. That new law took effect April 25, just one day earlier.


The new law declares the federal government has no authority to regulate guns, ammunition and accessories manufactured, sold and kept only in Kansas. The law also makes it a felony for a federal agent to enforce any law, regulation, order or treaty covering those items.

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt says his office is working overtime to keep up with the influx of applications for concealed-carry permits.

Schmidt's office received almost 3,500 in April, making it the third-highest month since the state's licensing program began in 2007.

The office also received a record 4,072 applications in March for the licenses.

Schmidt says his office has been criticized for not processing applications within the legal maximum of 90 days.

I was considering the paranoid, fearful actions of our oh-so-very-conservative legislature yesterday, and I’m afraid I uttered an unmentionable word out loud. Our Airedale Lucy came bounding into my office to comfort me.

A Smorgasbord Of Gun Bills Up For Vote In Kansas House

Mar 14, 2013
Stephen Koranda

The Kansas House is preparing to vote on three proposals to change state gun regulations.

A Kansas legislative committee has advanced a bill that would expand the number of public buildings in which concealed weapons are allowed.

Gun rights advocates in Kansas want lawmakers to counter any moves by the federal government to restrict access to firearms.

Advocates traveled to Topeka Tuesday to hear the House and Federal State Affairs Committee consider a bill that aims to protect gun rights in Kansas.