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Kansas legislators are debating a bill designed to keep guns out of the hands of fugitives and domestic abusers and could consider other gun issues.

The Senate planned to take a final vote Thursday on the measure. The bill would make it a felony under state law for anyone convicted of domestic violence to possess a firearm within five years of conviction. It would also be illegal for fugitives to possess guns.

But senators expected to take up other gun proposals as well during their debate.

Stephan Bisaha / KMUW

Students across Kansas joined their peers elsewhere in the country by walking out of school Wednesday and into the national debate over guns.

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

Republicans in the Kansas House on Tuesday unveiled a plan they say will make schools safer.

File Photo /

Listening to news reports while driving to the Statehouse on the day after the deadly high school shooting in Florida, Kansas Sen. Barbara Bollier decided to redouble her efforts to put a “red flag” law on the books in Kansas.

She wants a system for temporarily confiscating guns from people deemed a risk to themselves or others.

“It’s not something that tramples on somebody’s rights,” said Bollier, a Mission Hills Republican. “It just puts a temporary hold on a situation until things calm down.”

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Wichita businessman Wink Hartman, who last week dropped from the Kansas governor’s race and backed Kris Kobach, said he’s offered his arena to the National Rifle Association for its upcoming national convention.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service/File photo

Kansas schools already have the freedom to arm their teachers. Gov. Jeff Colyer now says bonuses for teachers who pack weapons might be in order.

Storem / flickr Creative Commons

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is urging the National Rifle Association to bring its annual convention to Kansas.

The Kansas City Star reports that the Republican gubernatorial candidate tweeted over the weekend that he's reached out to the NRA to urge the group to bring the gathering to Kansas.

Kobach earlier tweeted that "Kansas is the most pro-gun state in America."

Kansas schools that want to offer gun training in the earliest grades would be required to use a program designed by the National Rifle Association, under a bill lawmakers studied on Tuesday.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas lawmakers have rejected an effort to repeal a law that allows people to carry concealed firearms in most facilities at public colleges and universities in the state.

The Lawrence Journal-World reports that the Kansas House voted 53-69 against Democratic Rep. Barbara Ballard's repeal amendment Thursday.

Storem / flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas House advanced a bill that will allow people as young as 18 to carry concealed weapons.

Currently only those 21 and older can carry concealed weapons. The new law would require those between 18 and 21 to get a gun permit, which is not required after age 21.

The bill advanced Thursday by a vote of 85-35 and could come to a final vote Friday.