guns

Sam Zeff / KCUR

The fight is raging on in Topeka over whether to roll back a law that would let almost anyone carry a concealed gun on a college campus or in a library or public hospital.

The debate has mostly been around whether guns enhance or detract from people’s safety.

Less talked about is just how much allowing guns on campuses could cost.

For one Kansas City area institution, it could run into the millions.

Most Kansas Board of Regents institutions have said they have little choice but to let people carry concealed weapons on university or community college campuses.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas lawmakers are considering a proposal to allow public hospitals, mental facilities and nursing homes to ban concealed weapons.

Tuesday, a committee debated whether the state should allow the University of Kansas Health System to continue banning concealed guns in its facilities. Republican Representative John Barker proposed expanding that exemption to include other health care facilities.

“I think this is a reasonable approach, a balancing act. Rights are given to us," Barker says, "but we’ve always had some control."

Hugo Phan / KMUW

Students and staff against a law allowing guns on college campuses held a demonstration on the Wichita State University campus Tuesday.

A small group gathered near the Rhatigan Student Center to speak out against guns on campus. The rally was called "Carry Minds, Not Guns."

Organizers spoke of the need to contact lawmakers, emphasizing that there is power in numbers. Freshman Ian Englebright says he thinks legislators in favor of the law are creating more problems than solutions.

Michael Saechange / flickr Creative Commons

A federal judge in Wichita considered a Kansas gun law when he sentenced two men for federal firearms violations Monday. As a result, the men won’t be headed to prison.

Shane Cox and Jeremy Kettler, both of Chanute, were convicted in November on charges under the National Firearms Act, which makes it a crime for convicted felons to own or possess a firearm.

Cox and Kettler fell into that category, but they mistakenly thought a Kansas law would shield them from federal prosecution.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Officials from the University of Kansas Health System are asking state lawmakers to let them continue banning guns. State law will require the hospital to either allow concealed guns later this year or install more security, including metal detectors and security staff.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Opponents of allowing guns on Kansas campuses are not giving up their fight, despite a setback in a state Senate committee this week.

Hugo Phan / KMUW/File photo

A bill that would exempt Kansas colleges from a mandate that they allow concealed carry of handguns is stuck in committee after failing to win approval Tuesday.

Sam Zeff / Kansas News Service

Mothers, college professors, pastors, teachers and students packed a Capitol hearing room Thursday morning to make this plea to lawmakers: Roll back a law that in July will make it legal for almost anyone to carry a concealed gun on Kansas college campuses and in other public buildings.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas lawmakers seeking to keep university campuses, hospitals and government buildings off limits to firearms are facing a familiar argument from opponents.

Namely, that such restrictions infringe on the right to keep and bear arms protected by the Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

“It’s a Second Amendment issue,” says Rep. John Whitmer, a Wichita Republican. “It’s a right to bear arms issue.”

Hugo Phan / KMUW/File photo

The debate over allowing concealed guns on college campuses is starting to heat up in the Kansas Statehouse.

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