Health

Chanute Tribune

CHANUTE – The co-owners of a 45-bed nursing facility here that cares for people with severe and persistent mental illnesses have decided to shutter the business.

“We just got our rate-setting form from the state, telling us that our per-day reimbursement would be going down by $4.96 per person, per day,” said Mary Harding, director of nursing at Applewood Rehabilitation, Inc.

“That equates to about $7,000 less a month,” she said. “We’ve been barely breaking even for a while now, so we made the choice that we had to make, and that was to close.”

kumed.com

The University of Kansas Hospital is teaming up with 14 small hospitals and medical centers in the western part of the state to make improvements to rural health care.

A three-year, $12.5 million grant from the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovation Center has enabled the hospital to create the Kansas Heart and Stroke Collaborative, the Lawrence Journal-World reports.

Cary and Kacey Jordan, flickr Creative Commons

Sedgwick County Commissioners unanimously approved a grant extension on Wednesday afternoon for the county’s Healthy Babies program, despite questioning its effectiveness.

The program offers advice and support for at-risk mothers in the hopes of decreasing the county’s infant mortality rate, which has consistently hovered above state and national averages.

Commissioners Richard Ranzau and Jim Howell said the county’s rate of 7.7 deaths per 1,000 live births isn’t improving.

Khan Hmong, flickr Creative Commons

The Clean Indoor Air Act went into effect in Kansas five years ago today. The law prohibits smoking in most public places, including workplaces, public buildings, bars and restaurants.

Prior to 2002, smoking policies were left up to the owners and managers of individual facilities. But that year, Salina City Commissioners began debating an ordinance to ban smoking in restaurants, with an exception for late-night hours.

Ludo Rouchy, flickr Creative Commons

A new health initiative in Sedgwick County aimed at preventing diabetes and heart disease is up and running.

A $2.3 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is funding the program.

The program is called HealthICT. In this case, the"ICT" stands for 'innovate, coordinate and transform' the health of Wichita.

Health advocates say Sedgwick County has a 30 percent obesity rate, the highest in the state.

PHIL CAUTHON, KHI NEWS SERVICE

Thirty-year-old Brandon Brown was released from the Osawatomie State Hospital on May 14. Three days later, he allegedly attacked a fellow patient at the Haviland Care Center, a nursing facility that specializes in caring for adults with mental illness.

The victim, 61-year-old Jerry Martinez, recently died. And Brown has been charged with second degree murder. The incident has prompted new questions about staffing and budget issues at the state’s two hospitals for the mentally ill.

Kaiser Family Foundation

The U.S. Supreme Court’s rejection of the latest legal challenge to the Affordable Care Act preserves federal tax subsidies that nearly 70,000 Kansans used this year to help them purchase health insurance.

If the decision released Thursday had gone the other way, those Kansans, many of whom were previously uninsured, might have been forced to drop their coverage.

Bryan Thompson

A lot of the hospitals in rural Kansas are called “Critical Access Hospitals.” It’s an important designation, because Critical Access Hospitals were created by the federal government to maintain access to health care in rural areas. But as Heartland Health Monitor’s Bryan Thompson reports, several factors are making it harder for those hospitals to survive.

Sean Sandefur

Tomorrow marks National HIV Testing Day throughout the country. It’s estimated that 1.2 million Americans have the disease and about 14 percent of those individuals don’t know they’re infected. 


Jeff Kubina, flickr Creative Commons

Millions of Americans who obtained health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, popularly known as Obamacare, are now breathing a sigh of relief, following a decision from the U.S. Supreme Court.

More than 6 million lower income Americans got subsidies to help them buy health insurance on the federal marketplace, known as healthcare.gov. Without those subsidies, most of them wouldn’t be able to afford the premiums.

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