Health

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Kansas child care advocates say the state’s new welfare law could jeopardize a $42 million federal grant. State officials disagree.

The welfare law at issue was passed by conservative Republicans to tighten eligibility requirements and move low-income Kansans off welfare and into jobs.

Some of the changes in the law could make it harder for some welfare recipients to maintain their eligibility without interruption, says Shannon Cotsoradis, CEO of the nonprofit advocacy group Kansas Action for Children.

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Some advocates for seniors and Kansans with disabilities are calling for changes in the state’s privatized Medicaid program. As Jim McLean of the Kansas Health Institute reports, they want a more independent process for resolving disputes over services.

More from Dave Ranney at the Heartland Health Monitor.

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KU Medical Center broke ground today on a new health education building. The $75 million structure will replace outdated facilities where medical and nursing students are trained.

Premiums for Kansas health insurance plans offered in the federal marketplace won’t increase as much as originally proposed, state Insurance Commissioner Ken Selzer said Tuesday.

In May, Kansas insurance companies requested rate increases of up to 39 percent for individual market policies to be sold through the healthcare.gov marketplace during the next open enrollment period, which begins Nov. 1 and ends Jan. 31, 2016.

A recent ruling by a federal appeals court could affect whether some elderly and disabled Kansans continue to receive the services they need to remain in their homes and stay out of nursing facilities.

This is another case that pitted the Obama administration against states led by conservative Republicans.

Bryan Thompson

The federal government is providing more than $4 million this year to open six new health centers in Kansas. These clinics offer comprehensive primary care to everyone, whether the patient has insurance, or not. As Heartland Health Monitor’s Bryan Thompson reports, they can be a lifeline for people who struggle to pay for health care.

Dean Shareski, flickr Creative Commons

Johnson County health officials are trying to stop the spread of a water-borne disease caused by a microscopic germ.

At least three cases of Cryptosporidiosis have been confirmed in Johnson County.

The disease causes diarrhea and other intestinal symptoms. It can be spread through pool water, because it's resistant to chlorine.

healthcare.gov

This year's open enrollment for health insurance through the federal marketplace ended February 15th, and the 2016 sign-up period doesn't open until November first. But as Heartland Health Monitor's Bryan Thompson explains, thousands of Kansans have been able to sign up in the last six months anyway.

That's because of what the government refers to as special enrollment periods. They're based on the notion that life can change, so enrollment needs to be flexible.

Dave Ranney file photo / KHI News

The president of the Kansas Hospital Association is taking issue with recent comments made by Gov. Sam Brownback about Medicaid expansion.

The governor said rather than lobbying for expansion, hospitals should address their financial problems by innovating and getting more efficient. He said reductions in Medicare payments triggered by the Affordable Care Act are the biggest problem for Kansas hospitals.

But hospital association president Tom Bell says the governor is wrong about that.

Cary and Kacey Jordan, flickr Creative Commons

Wichita was recently ranked in the top 20 for American cities with the highest number of births.

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