health

Michael Cannon, flickr Creative Commons

A group pushing for elimination of the sales tax on groceries in Kansas is touting a new study.

The Wichita State University study shows that even before it was raised last month from 6.15 percent to 6.5 percent, the statewide sales tax was costing rural grocers an average of about $18,000 a year in lost sales.

The study was paid for by KC Healthy Kids, a nonprofit organization pushing to make Kansas the 37th state to eliminate its sales tax on groceries.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas health officials say five lakes around the state currently have toxic algae blooms.

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment says warnings for blue-green algae have been issued for Chisolm Creek Park Lake in Sedgwick County, Lovewell State Park Lake in Jewell County, Marion Reservoir in Marion County, Memorial Park Lake in Barton County and Norton Lake in Norton County.

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

The U.S. Senate has approved bi-partisan legislation to clarify the circumstances under which veterans are allowed to get medical care from their hometown providers at the VA’s expense. Heartland Health Monitor’s Bryan Thompson has more…

Wichita State University

A Wichita State University professor has been honored with the National Humanitarian Physician Assistant of the Year award. KMUW’s Abigail Wilson has more…

The American Academy of Physician Assistants awarded this year’s honor to Gina Brown, assistant professor of the physician assistant program at WSU.

Brown’s own students nominated her for the award, which recognizes a PA who has demonstrated an outstanding commitment to human rights and to providing accessible and quality health care on both domestic and international levels.

A new report says nearly all Kansans are exposed to air that's polluted with smoke, but the source of that smoke isn't clear.

The report from a non-profit environmental group, the Natural Resources Defense Council, shows that virtually all Kansans breathed smoke pollution in 2011 and that 2.8 million Kansans were exposed to medium-to-high-density smoke for anywhere from 12 to 47 days.

Columbia University Environmental Health Professor Patrick Kinney says smoke is a serious health hazard, even if you can’t smell it.

Aileen LeBlanc / KMUW

The KMUW news department is working on an extensive piece exploring the balance between primary care doctors and specialty physicians.

In this preview, you'll hear some of the people and situations that KMUW's Aileen LeBlanc has gathered for the story.

You'll meet patients in Belleville, a student doctor, her mentor there and the head of the KU School of Medicine in Wichita.

The rate of drug overdose deaths in Kansas has more than doubled since 1999, but the rate has gone up even more in many other states.

As a result, Kansas now has the eighth-lowest drug overdose mortality rate in the country, according to a new report from the non-profit Trust for America’s Health.

Wichita State University's Evelyn Hendren Cassat Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic is offering free hearing screenings on Mondays the rest of this month, on Oct. 7, 14, 21 and 28.

Appointments are open to the general public and available from 8:30-11:30 a.m. and 1-4:30 p.m.

The clinic also offers hearing evaluation services, hearing aids, etc.

The clinic is located at the WSU Hughes Metropolitan Complex, Entrance T, at 29th and Oliver. Appointments can be scheduled by calling 978-3289.

The first-ever statewide report on infections occurring in Kansas hospitals shows progress against two specific types of infections.

Hand-washing is one of the most important precautions to keep from spreading germs to susceptible patients. Hospitals are also trying to use urinary catheters only when there’s no other option. They’re also reducing the use of central lines—IV ports that go into a large blood vessel.

The results from 2011 show that Kansas is well below national averages for usage of those devices, and for the infections that result.

A nursing home watchdog group says Kansas nursing home residents would benefit from increased requirements for direct care from nurses and nurse-aides in nursing homes. Current regulations require adequate staffing to provide each resident a minimum of two hours of direct care daily.

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