health insurance

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says about 1,800 Kansans who chose health insurance through HealthCare.gov could lose their coverage over questions about their citizenship or immigration status.

The department says the 1,800 Kansans had inconsistencies in their citizenship or immigration information when they signed up on the federal health insurance marketplace.

They must send in proof of their legal status by Sept. 5 or they will lose their coverage by the end of September.

The largest health insurance company in Kansas will offer another year of coverage under plans that it had expected to cancel because of the federal health care overhaul.

Kansas Insurance Commissioner Sandy Praeger and the state's largest health insurer say they're not sure yet about the implications of President Barack Obama's decision to modify part of the federal health care overhaul.

According to a new report, more than 145,000 women in Kansas were uninsured last year. That’s a little less than 17 percent. But a majority of Hispanic women in Kansas—53.4 percent—have no health insurance. That’s one of the highest rates in the country.

The federal online marketplace for health insurance opens October 1.

As part of the Affordable Care Act, most Americans are required to have insurance beginning in 2014. This part of the law, referred to as the “individual mandate,” is designed to increase the number of consumers in the total insurance pool, with the intention of lowering premiums across the board.

Carla Eckels / KMUW

KMUW's Carla Eckels recently talked to Kansas Insurance Commissioner Sandy Praeger about how the Affordable Care Act is going to affect people in Kansas and what to expect when the health insurance marketplace opens on October 1. Learn more about the basics of the marketplace here.

1. I’ve been asking people about the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, and so many people don’t know much about it. They’re a bit confused, not knowing what to expect. Can you give us an overview?

Carla Eckels / KMUW

A health care reform expert fielded questions in Wichita Thursday about the Affordable Care Act.

A new report by the Center for Rural Affairs finds that rural residents stand to benefit from the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, more than their city-dwelling counterparts.

The author of the report, Jon Bailey, says the premium tax credits to help pay for individual health insurance plans, and the caps on out-of-pocket costs will be especially important to people who live in rural areas.

KanCare Selection Period Ends Thursday

Apr 1, 2013
KPR

The clock is ticking for the 380,000 Kansans whose health insurance comes through the Medicaid program now known as KanCare.

The KanCare program assigned each member to one of three private companies administering the benefits as of the first of the year. Members who prefer to switch to a different company have to do so no later than this Thursday.

At a recent educational meeting in Hays, KDHE policy and program analyst Effie Swanson said one reason to switch might be if your doctor is not signed up with your health plan’s network.

A new report says people who buy individual health insurance are saving money because of new regulations under the Affordable Care Act.

The report comes from the non-profit Commonwealth Fund and says cost savings and rebates to individual plan customers totaled almost $1.5 billion last year.

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