Hillary Clinton

A new poll shows Kansans are leaning toward Donald Trump in the upcoming election, but the report also shows that they aren't satisfied with state politics in general.

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Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate Wednesday night at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. KMUW will carry special live coverage starting at 8 p.m. CDT on 89.1 FM.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

CNN

This year’s presidential race may be one for the history books. But it’s not the contest Kansas voters wanted.

When Republicans caucused in March, they overwhelmingly preferred Texas Sen. Ted Cruz over eventual nominee Donald Trump.

Kansas Democrats gave Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders one of his biggest primary victories: a 68 percent to 32 percent drubbing of Hillary Clinton.

Hannah Figgs-Hoard was among a group of Sanders supporters at a Topeka caucus site that literally overwhelmed Clinton’s smaller contingent.

John Locher / AP/npr.org

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the second presidential debate Sunday night at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. KMUW will carry special live coverage starting at 8 p.m. CDT on 89.1 FM.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

Patrick Semansky / AP

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head-to-head in the first presidential debate Monday night.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

Follow highlights of the debate in NPR's updating news story at npr.org.

ALEX WONG / GETTY IMAGES

The first U.S. presidential debate is on Monday night between Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and her Republican rival Donald Trump. KMUW's Carla Eckels spoke with a Wichita debate coach about the matchup.

Jeff Jarman is interim director of the Elliott School of Communication, as well as the WSU debate coach. He says it will be fascinating to see how well each candidate can stick to their expectations.

Jarman says a lot of what the debates reveal is the character of the candidates, and he says we watch them to see if they can be presidential.

Courtesy Kelly Arnold / File photo

Former Republican Kansas Sen. Bob Dole says this presidential campaign is harsher than the times he ran.

Dole ran for president multiple times and was the Republican nominee in 1996. He said during a stop in Topeka that this year’s presidential campaign has been a “name-calling race” and the candidates aren’t hitting on some important policy issues.

“The American people, I really believe, want to know what you think about farms," he said. "Nobody’s discussed farm policy, which is pretty important to Kansas."

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Kansas Sen. Pat Roberts says the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal is crucial for farmers wanting access to new and growing markets. But in the midst of the presidential campaign the deal faces an uphill battle.

Speaking on a panel at the Kansas State Fair Saturday, Roberts, who is the Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman, distinguished the TPP from other trade deals. He says the agriculture industry stands to benefit too much for it to be allowed to fail.

Hugo Phan / KMUW/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach says he’s still advising Donald Trump's presidential campaign. He also hailed Trump's latest speech on immigration.

Kobach says Trump brought up issues like wage suppression caused by illegal immigration that often aren’t included in speeches.

“It was historic in the sense that I can’t remember a president or a presidential candidate in my lifetime giving a speech about immigration with that much detail or that much content in it,” Kobach says.

Courtesy Nathan Bales

The Democratic National Convention kicked off today in Philadelphia. The plan is four nights of speeches which will culminate with Hillary Clinton formally accepting the presidential nomination on Thursday. KMUW’s Sean Sandefur spoke with a Democratic delegate from Kansas who’s attending the event.

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