history

Commentary
5:30 am
Tue May 19, 2015

Vibrant Memories Of The Wichita Music Scene

The Outcasts
Credit Jim Kent / Wichita Music History Project

Popular culture often provides a useful window into the past, highlighting larger trends and issues that may not be apparent at first. This was the case when I became involved in a project documenting local rock bands from the 1950s through the 1970s.

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Commentary
5:30 am
Tue May 5, 2015

A Legislative Stepping Stone For Civil Rights

Dwight Eisenhower signs the 1960 Civil Rights Act
Credit Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

On May 6, 1960, President Dwight Eisenhower signed into law the second of four civil rights acts that serve as the foundation of federal civil rights statutes in the 20th and 21st centuries.

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Commentary
5:30 am
Tue April 21, 2015

The Last Thawing Of The Cold War?

Credit Monica delaria / Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

On Saturday, April 11, at the Summit of the Americas meeting in Panama, U.S. President Barack Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro had the first face-to-face discussion between the leaders of the two countries in several decades. Among other things, this historic meeting represents the last bit of thawing associated with the Cold War.

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Commentary
5:30 am
Tue April 7, 2015

The McClinton Market Comes Down

The McClinton Market shortly before it came down
Jay Price KMUW

The McClinton Market is gone.

Back in 2011, things seemed more promising when the building at 1205 E 12th Street in Wichita was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. I remember that nomination; I was on the State Historic Sites Board of Review then. It was one of the few surviving early African American owned business buildings in the city.

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Commentary
5:30 am
Tue March 24, 2015

The Roots Of The Word 'Feminism'

Feminist suffrage parade in New York City, 1912.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

By the end of the 20th century, the word "feminism" had acquired a definition and divisive reputation that, while historically inaccurate, spoke to the backlash against its simple, yet radical concept.

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Commentary
5:30 am
Tue March 10, 2015

Rights Won, Rights Lost

Credit National Museum of American History / flickr Creative Commons

March is often a time to think about women’s contributions, and how far women have come toward equality. However, it is also important to consider moments when women have lost rights.

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Commentary
5:30 am
Mon March 9, 2015

'Dead Wake' May Be Larson's Best Yet

If you’re travelling to Berlin, you’d do well to read Erik Larson’s In the Garden of Beasts. Going to Chicago? Read his The Devil in the White City. However, if you’re going on a cruise, beware Larson’s latest-- and, I think, best-- book, Dead Wake. Larson combines impeccable research, fully drawn characters and social history to tell of a fateful journey when the rules of war became more dangerous for all people.

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Commentary
5:30 am
Tue February 24, 2015

The Success Of An Early Kansan

1860 Census entry for Feldin Buckner and his family (courtesy Jay Price)

As we think of the founders of the Wichita area, some names are well known: Mead, Greiffenstein and Munger among them. Others are less known but worth considering. One of them is Feldin Buckner.

Buckner was the slave of a Judge Buckner in Kentucky. When Judge Buckner moved to Missouri, he freed Feldin... or "Fielding," depending on the source. Feldin Buckner married and had a large family. We know from the birthplaces of his eight children that the family moved to Iowa and Nebraska before they arrived in Kansas in the late 1850s, settling along the Whitewater.

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Commentary
5:30 am
Tue January 13, 2015

Recognizing A Major Event In Wichita's History

A black granite monument erected in 2007 with names of the victims lost in the Piatt Street Plane Crash.
Credit Carla Eckels / KMUW

This month marks the 50th anniversary of a KC-135 crashing into a predominantly African American neighborhood in northeast Wichita. This was more than just a neighborhood with a particular racial makeup, however. It represented the postwar suburban dream for Wichita’s African American community.

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Commentary
5:30 am
Tue December 30, 2014

The Architects of Justice

Credit ensh / Flickr / Creative Commons

The meaning of the words justice served relies on the social, political and legal contexts in which it is applied.

Two 19th-century U.S. Supreme Court cases reflect how the Court’s decisions can be swayed by contemporary racial politics. In its 1857 Dred Scott v. Sandford decision, the Court declared that African Americans could not sue for freedom in federal court because they were not considered citizens. This decision reversed 28 years of precedent, reflecting more the heightened division over slavery than impartial justice.

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