history

Commentary
5:00 am
Tue September 23, 2014

The Difficult Social History Uncovered By Ferguson

Credit Elvert Barnes (perspective) / Flickr / Creative Commons

One of the talking points associated with the recent racial disturbance in Ferguson, Mo. is the enhanced militarization of contemporary municipal police forces.

This process began in the late 1960s, in the aftermath of the widespread racial disturbances of that era. Moreover, as Michelle Alexander discusses in her book The New Jim Crow, this arms build-up accelerated in the 1970s, as local law enforcement agencies across the country began a so-called “War On Drugs,” waged primarily in black and brown neighborhoods.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Tue September 9, 2014

Hartford Convention Exposed Early Divisions

Political cartoon depicting the Hartford Conventioneers *possibly* leaping back into England's arms; by William Charles in 1814
Credit Public Domain

This year, Americans are observing the 200th anniversaries of events from the War of 1812, such as the burning of Washington, D.C. and the attack on Fort McHenry.

This year also marks the 200th anniversary of the Hartford Convention. Comprised of clandestine meetings held by anti-war New Englanders between December 1814 and January 1815, the Convention called for radical actions, such as the nullification of federal laws and possible secession from the union.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Heaven Take My Soul, and England Keep My Bones!

King John
Credit Cassell's History of England (Public Domain) / Wikimedia Commons

Although King John reigned for 17 years, until his death in 1216, England officially broke up with him in 1215, when the barons declared civil war and forced the king to sign the Magna Carta.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Tue August 26, 2014

A Tiny Kansas Schoolhouse With A Big History

The Ivanpah schoolhouse
Jay Price KMUW / Wichita State University

Ivanpah, in Greenwood County, is today little more than a schoolhouse. I recently gave a talk about it for the Symphony in the Flint Hills.

Dating from 1879, the community owed its origins to a sheep rancher named A.H. Thompson and a newspaperman, Frank Presbrey. A few days before I was to give my talk, a random internet search uncovered a story that made my jaw drop.

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Commentary
2:00 pm
Tue August 12, 2014

Politically Punishing A President

Republican House Speaker John Boehner
Credit gageskidmore / Flickr / Creative Commons

On July 30, the House of Representatives passed a resolution approving of Speaker John Boehner’s proposed lawsuit against President Barack Obama. This represented the first time in U.S. history that a chamber of Congress has endorsed a lawsuit against a president.

Historically, if Congress believed a sitting president engaged in unlawful behavior, it issued “articles of impeachment.” Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton have been the most recent targets of such punitive congressional action.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Tue July 29, 2014

The War That The Great War Helped Us Avoid

A soldier patrolling the United States–Mexico border, 1916.
Credit New York Times (Public Domain) / Wikimedia Commons

While Europe teetered on the brink of war during the summer of 1914, the threat of escalating violence and warfare with Mexico consumed Americans’ attentions.

The relationship between the United States and Mexico began to sour in 1910 as Mexico fell into a decade-long civil war. Until 1914, the U.S. warned Mexico that it would only get involved if the fighting threatened the lives or property of Americans living in Mexico. Twice, President Taft sent troops to the border as a warning, but did not allow them to intervene in the conflict.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Happy Birthday, Wichita STATE University!

Fiske Hall is the oldest surviving structure on Wichita State's campus
Credit Fletcher Powell / KMUW

This month is Wichita State University’s 50th birthday!

On July 1, 1964, the University of Wichita officially joined the state university system. It was not an easy journey.

The University of Wichita had been municipal university since the 1920s. By the 1960s, however, many in Wichita believed that the time had come for WU to join the state university system, serving the state, not just one city.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Tue July 1, 2014

Confronting Racism In Sports

Credit Mike Licht / Flickr / Creative Commons

As a fan of the National Basketball Association, and as someone who does research in African American history, the recent Donald Sterling debacle reminded me that former President Dwight D. Eisenhower was correct when he stated that laws and court decisions can’t necessarily change what’s in the hearts of individuals.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Wed June 25, 2014

New Exhibit Details Events of 'Freedom Summer'

Volunteers link arms and sing freedom songs before boarding the bus for Mississippi. Photograph by Ted Polumbaum.
Credit Image courtesy of The Kansas African American Museum

The Kansas African American Museum opened a new show this past weekend commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Freedom Summer of 1964.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Another Piece of the Civil Rights Fight

Howard W. Smith was responsible for adding sex as a protected class in the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

On June 19th 1964, the Senate passed the Civil Rights Act, breaking the 83-day filibuster by Southern Democrats. While this act is recognized as a groundbreaking piece of civil rights legislation for African Americans, it also held the key to future civil rights advancements and protections for women.

Two days before the final vote, Representative Howard W. Smith, a powerful Democrat from Virginia, added sex as a protected class to Title VII, a section that prohibits discrimination by employers. Historians have been wondering about his motivations ever since.

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