history

Commentary
12:30 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Past and Present: Financial Literacy

Credit 401(K) 2013 / Flickr / Creative Commons

Since the end of World War II, the cornerstone of the U.S. economy has been consumer spending.

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Commentary
12:30 pm
Wed August 21, 2013

Past and Present: Enacting Women's Suffrage

Credit national museum of american history / Flickr

On August 18, 1920, Tennessee approved the 19th Amendment, providing the final ratification necessary to enact women’s suffrage.

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Commentary
12:30 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Past and Present: An Overlooked History of Tolerance

During President Barack Obama’s recent trip to Africa, he made a stop in the West African nation of Senegal. Traditionally, the U.S. press corps’ coverage of Africa has tended to focus on military coups, religious and ethnic conflicts, and the AIDS epidemic. Because of this, Senegal, a former French colony, has fallen through the cracks of American media scrutiny.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Into It: The Rise of the Roller Coaster

Credit David Boyle, flickr Creative Commons

Roller coasters are the workhorse of the modern theme park, but their rise to popularity has been long and strange.

Its precursor could be found outside of St. Petersburg in the 1800s. Massive ice slides called Russian Mountains were reinforced with wood, plunging up to seventy feet at sharp angles.

We can still see this origin in the words for “rollercoaster” in romance languages like Spanish— La Montaña Rusa—and other variations in French, Italian and Portuguese. Strangely, the Russian term literally translates as “American Mountains.”

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Commentary
12:30 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Past and Present: Harry Sternberg

Mural by Harry Sternberg in a Chicago post office
Credit jimmywayne / Flickr

In 1936, the Guggenheim Foundation awarded graphic artist Harry Sternberg one of its prestigious fellowships to study and portray the lives of the American worker.

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Community
12:49 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Was The Civil War Inevitable? Two Historians Debate On Saturday

One of the cannons engraved with Civil War battles' names on the Battle Monument at West Point
Credit Wikimedia Commons

Two historians are marking the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg with a debate, asking whether the war could have been avoided.

Dr. Tom Morain of Graceland University in Iowa and Dr. James Juhnke, formerly of Bethel College in North Newton, Kan., will square off Saturday at the Sedgwick County Historical Museum in Wichita.

Morain said the debate's been held in Iowa for years, but this is the first time in Kansas.

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Commentary
12:30 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Past and Present: Route 66

Jay and the Buick Super at the Blue Swallow Motel in Tucumcari, N.M.
Jay Price KMUW

Over the years, I have traveled down various segments of Route 66 that, taken together, have covered or paralleled nearly the entire length of “the Mother Road.”

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Community
10:21 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Six Kansas Sites Added To National Register Of Historic Places

Santa Fe Trail Map
Credit Legends of Kansas

The Kansas Historical Society recently placed six Santa Fe Trail locations in Kansas on the National Register of Historic Places. With the addition of these sites in Marion and Morton counties, the state now has 1,310 registered historic sites.

Thirty properties were nominated for the Santa Fe Trail project, and these six were the first to be approved by the National Park Service.

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Commentary
12:30 pm
Wed May 15, 2013

Past and Present: Preservation

The Brutalist-style Central branch of the Wichita Public Library was built in the 1960s.
Credit Fletcher Powell / KMUW

My research includes the study of buildings constructed from about World War II to the 1970s.

It began with a study of Route 66 and the features along the “Mother Road.” Since then, my interest in the postwar built-landscape has extended to suburban ranch homes, one of which I just purchased, and to the religious landscape of 1950s and 1960s America.

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Commentary
12:30 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

Past and Present: The Ludlow Massacre

Credit Beverly & Pack / flickr Creative Commons

On April 20, 1914, the management at the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company, owned by the Rockefeller Family, ordered an attack on a tent colony just outside the town of Ludlow.

This decision resulted in the deaths of 20 people, including 2 women and 11 children who burned to death in tents that had been soaked in kerosene and set on fire.

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