immigration

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

On a feedlot in far southwest Kansas, two cowboys on horseback move cattle on the high dusty plains, spread out like dozens of football fields stitched together with miles of fences. Their “Buenos dias! Buenos dias!” greetings mix with moos on a hot summer morning.

They’re two of the 400 employees who work on the feedlot, which is one of the largest in the U.S. in a state that ranks third in meat production.

Experts are saying the Kansas economy is heavily dependent on global free trade and immigrant labor at a time when both are considered charged political issues in the U.S.

The Lawrence Journal-World reports that the University of Kansas' Institute for Policy and Social Research sponsored the annual Kansas Economic Policy Conference on Thursday.

Bryan Thompson / Kansas News Service

A rural hospital administrator in southwest Kansas has taken on the role of go-between for Kansans and immigrants from war-ravaged countries on the other side of the world.

File photo

Kansas is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse rulings by the state's highest court that they say prevent the state from prosecuting immigrants in the U.S. illegally for identity theft.

Attorney General Derek Schmidt said in a news release three rulings last week by the Kansas Supreme Court said federal immigration law superseded Kansas law in those types of cases.

Sedgwick County Sheriff's Office

Federal prosecutors are appealing a judge's decision to throw out a firearms charge against a man accused of plotting to attack Somali immigrants in a meatpacking town in western Kansas.

U.S. District Judge Eric Melgren in August dismissed a firearms charge against Curtis Allen along with evidence upon which that charge is based.

The government appealed that ruling Tuesday. Prosecutors contend that the evidence is substantial proof of a material fact in the case.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

In reaction to the announcement that President Trump is rescinding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, DACA recipients and immigration activists in Wichita are now calling on Congress to pass permanent legislation to protect young adults brought to the U.S. as kids.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Supporters of a policy that lets some undocumented immigrants stay in the U.S. rallied at the Kansas Statehouse Friday. They met as President Trump considers elimination of the program.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas branch of the American Civil Liberties Union is seeking information about communication between state attorney general Derek Schmidt and the federal government over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

Farms and ranches throughout the country won’t see their labor shortages solved by a renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

In a call with reporters while visiting Mexico ahead of the trade talks, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said labor issues likely wouldn’t be addressed during formal negotiations among the United States, Mexico and Canada, set to begin August 16th.

JULIE DENESHA / Harvest Public Media

Sonny Perdue, the former governor of Georgia, was sworn in as U.S. Secretary of Agriculture at the end of April.

Harvest Public Media’s Peggy Lowe sat down with Perdue on his fourth day on the job at the American Royal complex in Kansas City, Missouri. She asked him about the Trump administration’s priorities for our food system, government nutrition programs, immigration policy and the future of the Agriculture Department.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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