immigration

Frank Morris / KCUR and NPR

One year ago Thursday, the national news media turned its attention to Olathe, Kansas, where Adam Purinton allegedly screamed racist taunts before shooting two Indian tech workers and another man who tried to defend them at Austin’s Bar and Grill.

One of the Indian men was killed, and the United States Department of Justice labeled it a hate crime.

The shooting sparked a discussion about xenophobia in the age of Trump, but it also drew attention to what some consider a broken visa system for high-tech workers.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

Leaders of the India Association of Kansas City met at a Scooter's Coffee in south Overland Park Wednesday night to plan the first India Day celebration.

Most of these men did not know Srinivas Kutchibhotla, the 32-year-old Garmin engineer and Indian immigrant who was shot and killed on Feb. 22, 2017, at Austin’s Bar and Grill in Olathe. Nor did they know his best friend, Alok Madasini, or Ian Grillot, a bar patron who intervened.

But they all agree the tragedy sent frightening ripples through the local Indian community.


Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Lawmakers in Congress are running out of time to pass immigration reform legislation before the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program expires next month.

Dan Margolies / KCUR 89.3

Syed Jamal, the Lawrence resident detained by immigration authorities for overstaying his visa, was returned to the Kansas City area on Wednesday after the Board of Immigration Appeals in Virginia stayed his deportation.

Courtesy Sharma-Crawford Attorneys At Law

The threat of deportation has made Lawrence resident Syed Jamal an international cause celebre. On Monday, the U.S. Board of Immigration Appeals in Virginia granted a stay in his case, preventing immigration enforcement officials from deporting him to his native Bangladesh.

Jamal’s legal saga offers an illustration of the U.S. immigration system’s perils for people whose fate depends on the discretion of government officials making judgments in the context of an administration’s political priorities.

Courtesy Jamal family

This story was updated at 8:45 p.m. with new information about the case and comments from Jamal's attorneys.

In a wild day that saw immigration authorities put him on a plane headed for Hawaii, an immigration appeals board halted the deportation of Lawrence resident Syed Jamal, whose case has become an international cause celebre.

The move came after an immigration judge on Monday cleared the way for Jamal’s deportation after denying motions to reopen Jamal’s case and dissolving a stay that he granted last week.

Courtesy Jamal family

A chemistry professor living in Kansas who faced imminent deportation to Bangladesh has been granted a temporary stay.

Lawyers representing 55-year-old Syed Ahmed Jamal announced Thursday that a judge issued the temporary stay.

Jamal, who currently teaches at Park University in Missouri, was arrested Jan. 24 at his home in Lawrence, Kansas. He arrived legally in the U.S. in 1987 but after pursuing a doctorate he overstayed his visa. He and his Bangladeshi wife have three American citizen children.

Maria Carter / KCUR and NPR

Hundreds of people in Lawrence, Kansas, have mobilized around an effort to stop the deportation of Syed Jamal, a beloved father, chemistry professor and community volunteer.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, is set to expire in a less than a month. The White House has offered a proposal that protects Dreamers, but limits legal immigration. One Wichita woman says the plan puts her in a difficult position.

The woman, who asked that her name not be used, is a U.S. citizen — but her parents, who live in Wichita, aren't.

Ben Kuebrich / Kansas News Service

A humanitarian group that helps refugees settle in western Kansas is shutting down its office in the region amid changing rules that welcome fewer newcomers to the country and the state.

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