infrastructure

Kansas received a passing grade for its highways earlier this week when the state’s chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers released its latest “infrastructure report card.” However, the engineers also warned that sweeping cuts to Kansas Department of Transportation funding are still causing roadways to suffer.

City of Wichita

Wichita officials are looking at ways to spur more development in the center of the city, even as it expands outward.

Kansas Department of Transportation

Wichita Mayor Jeff Longwell says the $200 billion dollars in federal funding included in President Trump’s infrastructure plan announced Monday is a welcome investment—even though the plan puts most of the funding burden on state and local governments.

Matthew Hodapp / KCUR/File photo

President Donald Trump unveiled a $1.5 trillion infrastructure proposal on Monday built on plans that would more heavily rely on state and local dollars being matched with money from Washington.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Sen. Jerry Moran says President Trump’s State of the Union address Tuesday night touched on topics important to Kansans—in particular, infrastructure.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service/File photo

Lt. Gov. Jeff Colyer steps in as governor of Kansas Wednesday afternoon. His predecessor, Republican Gov. Sam Brownback, has been packing up his office in recent days, and is leaving behind a wish list for state lawmakers.

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

Local governments and school boards are worried about the possible effects on infrastructure and other projects if Congress passes a tax bill that eliminates exemptions for certain refinancing of bonds.

The Kansas Association of School Boards, which includes most of the state’s 286 boards of education, is urging its members to contact Sen. Jerry Moran and Sen. Pat Roberts — both Kansas Republicans — about voting against the bill.

Laura Nawrocik / flickr Creative Commons

Wichita residents will pay higher water and sewer rates starting next year after City Council members voted to move forward with planned infrastructure improvements.

The overall utility rate will go up just over 6 percent: For residential customers, that means $2.69 to $6.72 more on their monthly water and sewer bills. 

It's slightly higher than last year's rate increase, and higher than the base increase anticipated this year. The additional revenue will go toward funding Phase II of the city's infrastructure maintenance and improvement project.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

A public hearing has been scheduled for next month on a proposed 1 percent sales tax to support a development in west Wichita.

In 2015 a community improvement district, or CID, was established in the area around Kellogg and West Street. Now, developers want to amend the CID to include newly purchased buildings.

Businesses in the district can charge an additional sales tax, with the revenue being used to pay for land acquisition, demolitions, and site improvements.

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

Dennis Wright isn’t alone.

He’s one of hundreds, perhaps thousands, of Kansas residents and public officials waiting for the state to solve its money problems so that dozens of highway projects that have been indefinitely delayed can get going again.

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