KanCare

Update 08/17/16:

Gov. Brownback has released the following statement about the KanCare cuts:

Jim McLean / Heartland Health Monitor

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback is sticking to his talking points. In a rare informal conversation with Statehouse reporters late last week, Brownback said the results of the recent primary election aren’t causing him to re-think his positions on tax cuts, school finance and Medicaid expansion.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Two of the state’s three KanCare Medicaid contracts were making a profit by the end of last year, according to a report given to lawmakers Friday in Topeka.

Some previous records had shown losses at all three of the companies that manage the state’s privatized Medicaid program. By the end of 2015, the newest report shows UnitedHealthcare had made $44 million, Amerigroup had made $31 million and Sunflower Health Plan had lost $16 million.

Heartland Health Monitor / File photo

Kansas hospitals are trying to stop more than $56 million in Medicaid cuts set to take effect tomorrow.

The Kansas Hospital Association is urging federal officials to stop Gov. Sam Brownback from implementing $56.4 million in Medicaid cuts set to take effect Friday.

Brownback ordered the cuts in May to cover shortfalls in the fiscal year 2017 budget approved by the Legislature. The hospital association is asking the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to immediately intervene to stop the cuts, which include a 4 percent reduction in provider payments.

Susie Fagan / KHI News Service

Supporters of Medicaid expansion are kicking off a campaign to mobilize Kansas voters on the issue.

kees.ks.gov

Kansas Medicaid officials are working to clear a massive application backlog. But as Heartland Health Monitor’s Jim McLean reports, new complaints are surfacing about problems facing low-income, disabled and elderly Kansans seeking to enroll in the health care program.

A Lawrence lawyer and others who help people enroll in KanCare, the state's privatized Medicaid program, say the number who are being mistakenly denied is on the rise. 

Courtesy

A new survey by Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute shows stark differences between states that have expanded Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act, and those—like Kansas and Missouri—that haven’t.

Researchers interviewed leaders of major hospital systems and safety net clinics in seven states--four that expanded Medicaid and three that didn’t.

http://www.kancare.ks.gov

Kansas health care providers are gearing up to fight the Medicaid cuts that Gov. Sam Brownback has ordered to balance the state budget.

KanCare covers more than 400,000 Kansans--mainly low-income families, but also people with disabilities and elderly Kansans in nursing homes who have used up their life savings.

The Kansas Hospital Association says it will urge federal officials to reject the proposed cuts and might also go to court to stop them.

Alex Proimos, flickr Creative Commons

Last fall NPR, Harvard, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation partnered to survey Americans about their perceptions of health care. Kansas was one of seven states singled out for a closer look. And the thing that stood out about Kansans was the degree of concern they expressed about the cost of health care.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Budget problems are forcing Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback to make cuts in the state Medicaid program that he once said he wouldn’t make.

In 2012, Brownback was pushing lawmakers to approve his plan to privatize Medicaid. In his State of the State speech that year he said creating KanCare would save money--and do it in a more responsible way than other states.

“Now many states are either kicking people off of Medicaid or paying doctors and other providers less," he said. "Neither of these choices providers better outcomes.”

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