Kansas budget

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Gov. Sam Brownback has until later this week to take action on a budget passed by Kansas lawmakers. It’s likely he’ll sign it into law, but as KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, there will be some budget cutting associated with the new spending plan.

Kansas lawmakers approved a budget that isn’t balanced, with the assumption that the governor will make millions of dollars in spending cuts. The state Constitution says there must be enough revenue to cover expenses. Brownback says he can make budget cuts before signing the bill into law to comply with that.

Stephen Koranda

Gov. Sam Brownback is considering a budget plan that requires him to make spending cuts. Brownback says he has not yet decided if he’ll veto a provision in the budget affecting the University of Kansas and Kansas State University. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, the budget item says spending cuts should hit those schools harder than other universities.


The Wichita chapter of the Society for Professional Journalists is hosting a talk Tuesday night about the Kansas budget and the state’s tax policy.

The event will feature Annie McKay, executive director of the Kansas Center for Economic Growth and the incoming president and CEO of Kansas Action for Children. KCEG describes itself as nonpartisan and was created in 2013 to educate Kansans about the state’s economic policies.

Abigail Wilson / KMUW

The USD 259 Board of Education will meet tonight.

Members of the public are scheduled to speak against about the possible closure of Metro Meridian Alternative High School and earlier start times for several schools. Both ideas are being considered by Wichita Public Schools as ways to save money for the upcoming school year.

Jimmy Wayne, flickr Creative Commons

Wichita State University is planning on a 3 percent budget cut for fiscal year 2017. The move is in response to the state budget passed Monday that includes $17 million in cuts to higher education.

WSU President John BARdo said in a message sent Thursday that the cuts should be considered permanent, saying "it’s unlikely state funding will be restored to universities in the next budget cycle."

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

An unusual coalition of lawmakers helped soundly defeat a bill that would have repealed a tax exemption for Kansas businesses. The tax policy allows more than 300,000 Kansas businesses to avoid paying income taxes. Republican Representative Sue Boldra called the repeal effort a step in the right direction.

“It’s not the whole pie, as many of us desire, but certainly this is enough to right our ship of state and get a handle on our budget,” Boldra said.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Kansas lawmakers struggled over the weekend, working late nights as they tried to craft a budget solution. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, they ultimately approved a plan in the early hours of Monday morning.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Kansas lawmakers will return to the Statehouse this week and they'll be looking for ways to erase a budget deficit. Part of that discussion could focus on business taxes. As KPR's Stephen Koranda reports, some legislators say it's time to reconsider a tax policy that lets thousands of business owners pay no state income tax.

Republican Sen. Jim Denning is one of the Kansas lawmakers saying the business tax exemption needs to be rolled back or modified. Denning says he’s tired of budget solutions he sees as one-time fixes.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Leaders in the Kansas Statehouse are hoping to avoid a repeat of last year’s session, which went into overtime by more than 20 days.

This week, legislators began reviewing Gov. Sam Brownback’s proposals to erase a budget shortfall. Republican Rep. Ron Ryckman says they’re trying to familiarize themselves with the issues before the session resumes.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Governor Brownback’s office pitched three budget-balancing options to Kansas lawmakers this week, but it doesn’t look like legislative leaders are planning to rubber stamp any of the proposals. 

The chair of the Senate’s budget-writing committee, Republican Ty Masterson, says he doesn’t believe any of the three will be approved by lawmakers.

“These are just three options the governor produced. We’re going to look at them, evaluate them. I’m sure none of the three will come out exactly as he’s intended them. Could be a combination of the three,” Masterson says.