Kansas Corporation Commission

Madeline Fox / Kansas News Service

Kansas’ energy-regulating agency will investigate nearly a decade’s worth of permits it granted to oil and gas companies after learning recently that some wells received permits without meeting certain state regulations.

The probe, announced Tuesday, will determine the number of wells approved since 2008 without the companies giving nearby residents accurate information about their rights to protest the wells.

wikipedia.org

Shareholders on Tuesday OK'd a new plan for the merger between two of the region’s largest power companies: Great Plains Energy (the parent company of Kansas City Power & Light) and Westar Energy. Meanwhile, Kansas regulators set a timeline for giving their approval to this latest deal.

Brian Grimmett/KMUW

Overnight temperatures have begun to dip near or below freezing. That can mean increased utility bills, and for many low-income families, increased financial pressure as they try to pay them.

File Photo / Kansas News Service

Kansas’ energy-regulating agency is trying to determine why permits were issued for half a dozen wastewater wells whose operators didn’t accurately inform nearby residents of their rights to protest the wells.

The deficiencies were discovered by a resident of Matfield Green in Chase County who objects to the wells, into which companies can pour hundreds or thousands of barrels of oil- and gas-related wastewater per day.

Cindy Hoedel wants the Kansas Corporation Commission to shut down the wells and make the companies in question redo the application process.

Hazel Watson / flickr Creative Commons

Kansas utility regulators are moving forward with an accelerated program to replace aging gas pipelines, despite objections from three energy companies.

The Kansas Corporation Commission approved its Accelerated Replacement Program last month, calling on gas companies to speed up the process of fixing or replacing old pipes.

Kansas Geological Survey

The governments of Douglas County and Lawrence are calling for changes to Kansas regulations amid an energy company’s proposal to pump wastewater into wells in rural Eudora.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service/File photo

Kansas energy regulators have given the green light for an oil company to dispose of production-related wastewater in the Flint Hills — a plan that had met with resistance from residents.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

Residents of the Flint Hills on Wednesday took a fight against an oil company to Kansas energy regulators as part of their broader battle to stem wastewater disposal in the area.

They fear that a request from Quail Oil and Gas to jettison up to 5,000 barrels a day of brine near Strong City and the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve brings a risk for earthquakes or contamination of local groundwater — claims that the company disputes. 

The Kansas Corporation Commission won't allow Westar Energy and Great Plains Energy extra time to renegotiate a new merger.

After the commission in April rejected the proposed merger, the two companies filed a petition asking for extra time to revise the deal to meet commissioners' expectations.

The Topeka Capital-Journal reports the commission rejected the request Tuesday. The commission's staff has recommended the companies start an entirely new case for the merger.

Keith Ewing / flickr Creative Commons

An annual program meant to protect low-income Kansans during the coldest months of the year is set to go into effect this week.

Kansas’ Cold Weather Rule, established by the Kansas Corporation Commission in 1983, runs from Nov. 1 through March 31. It helps to ensure that electric, gas and water service won’t be disconnected from a person’s home during the winter.

Pages