Kansas Democratic Party

Frank Morris / KCUR

Of course, Republicans dominate Kansas. They hold all the statewide offices and control both houses of the Legislature.

Meantime, Kansas Democrats have just elected a younger, and more progressive chairman, John Gibson. Gibson’s a lawyer who was raised on a farm in Missouri, went to MIT, and settled in the countryside northeast of Topeka.

In an interview at the Washington Days convention, where he was elected chairman, Gibson says Kansas Democrats are on a better trajectory than the party nationally and, maybe, on a roll.

Frank Morris / KCUR

In deep-red Kansas, state Democrats threw their most energized annual meeting in years in Topeka on Saturday, largely thanks to the featured speaker: Vermont senator and former presidential hopeful Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Laura Spencer / KCUR/File photo

Democrats and Libertarians from Kansas' 4th Congressional District will each have nominating conventions Saturday to select their nominees for the special election to replace Mike Pompeo, who was picked to be the president's new director of the CIA.

Kansas’ political parties are meeting this week to select their candidates for the 4th Congressional District special election.

donkeyhotey / Flickr / Creative Commons

Kansas Republicans are meeting Feb. 9 and Democrats are convening two days later to pick their nominees for the congressional seat formerly held by CIA Director Mike Pompeo.

The special GOP convention in the 4th Congressional District will be in Wichita at Friends University and starts at 7 p.m.

Democrats plan to meet at 1 p.m. Feb. 11 at the Sedgwick County Courthouse in Wichita.

In both parties, local activists make the choice.

Gov. Sam Brownback has called an April 11 special election to fill the seat.

Hugo Phan / KMUW/File photo

Former Republican Congressman Todd Tiahrt is among several people who have expressed interest in replacing U.S. congressional Rep. Mike Pompeo, who has been appointed as the next CIA director in the Trump administration, pending Senate approval.

Kansas Democrats / Facebook

The Kansas Democratic Party is analyzing the results of the general election to see what needs to change going forward.

Kansas Democrats say even though their candidates lost some races, there is still a lot to be proud of this recent election cycle.

State party Chair Lee Kinch says all of the Democratic incumbents in the state Legislature were re-elected. The party also gained one seat in the state Senate and 13 seats in the state House.

Kinch says voting results show Democrats lost support among union families this year, and he wants to know why.

donkeyhotey / Flickr / Creative Commons

Now that the registration deadline has passed, both parties in the state of Kansas are concentrating their efforts on getting out the vote.

With just weeks until the general election, both Republican and Democratic parties are encouraging their members to go to the polls.

Kerry Gooch, executive director of the Kansas Democratic Party, says that it's not just Democrats that he is concentrating on.

Heather Katsoulis / flickr Creative Commons

Kansas’ two main political parties are hoping voters work their way down the entire ballot on Nov. 8.

The Kansas Democratic Party has started a social media campaign called “Finish the Ballot" where they're encouraging voters to consider more races than just the one at the top of the ticket: the race for president.

Field and political director Cheyenne Davis says it’s often those down-ballot races that have the most impact on voters’ daily lives.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is defending his role as an advisor to Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. Kobach has been giving the candidate advice on immigration issues and advocating for Trump on national news programs. Kobach says his role as secretary of state is both elected and partisan, so he doesn't see any conflict between his Kansas job and his open support of Trump.

“For a secretary of state to express positions, in particular ones where I might have some expertise outside of my official capacity, I think that’s perfectly fine,” Kobach. says

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