Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services

Heartland Health Monitor/File photo

Kansas officials have received a court order Friday to expedite their takeover of 15 financially troubled nursing homes. State regulators say they need to move quickly to protect hundreds of elderly and disabled Kansans who reside in the facilities.

Susan NYC / flickr, Creative Commons

Kansas officials are moving to protect more than 800 vulnerable residents of 15 financially troubled nursing homes across the state.

The Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services is seeking court orders to put the facilities — currently operated by a New Jersey company — into receivership.

That would allow another company to take over operations pending arrangements to either sell the homes or close them.

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Officials with the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services said Thursday that a staff member improperly disclosed personal information for 11,000 people in an email sent to multiple addresses.

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

Nursing homes in Kansas find themselves in crisis, say the people who run them.

Heartland Health Monitor/File photo

Editor's Note: This story was updated at 3:50 p.m.

A discrimination complaint filed earlier this year by a Tennessee woman who claims a former Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services official sexually harassed her is still pending before the Kansas Human Rights Commission.

Andy Marso / Kansas Health Institute

Editor's Note: This story was updated on Tuesday, Dec. 12 at 3:50 p.m.  

A newspaper report published over the weekend says a former official at the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services continued to work at the agency even after he faced allegations of sexual harassment.

Rick Kimpel / flickr Creative Commons

Health care officials say Kansas nursing homes are hesitant to take patients who need hospice care and who are waiting on Medicaid coverage because they may not get paid for the care they provide.

A backlog of Medicaid applications has been affecting Kansas nursing homes in recent years. Beneficiaries of Kansas' privatized Medicaid program, KanCare, wait months to see their applications approved while nursing homes provide care for which they aren't paid, the Topeka Capital-Journal reported.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

Inspectors arrived Tuesday at Osawatomie State Hospital to determine whether the state-run psychiatric facility can regain its federal certification and, with it, its Medicare funding.

Susan NYC / flickr, Creative Commons

Sedgwick County commissioners approved additional funding for a program that provides in-home services for older people who have limited physical abilities.

The Senior Care Act program will add two full-time positions in 2018. The program serves people 60 years old and older in Sedgwick, Butler and Harvey counties.

The program provides in-home help with personal care, meals, appointments, and light housework.

Annette Graham with the Sedgwick County Division on Aging says 170 seniors are receiving services, and another 200 are on a waiting list.

PHIL CAUTHON / KHI News Service/File photo

A Democratic candidate for Kansas governor says the Brownback administration is bent on privatizing a key mental health facility.

The Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services has unveiled a proposal to build a new mental hospital at Osawatomie, which a Tennessee company would run.

But Kansas House Minority Leader Jim Ward says the agency should be exploring in-house options.

"This administration has a terrible history of privatization. Whether it be child support collection, DCF, KanCare,” Ward says.

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