Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

Nursing homes in Kansas find themselves in crisis, say the people who run them.

Heartland Health Monitor/File photo

Editor's Note: This story was updated at 3:50 p.m.

A discrimination complaint filed earlier this year by a Tennessee woman who claims a former Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services official sexually harassed her is still pending before the Kansas Human Rights Commission.

Andy Marso / Kansas Health Institute

Editor's Note: This story was updated on Tuesday, Dec. 12 at 3:50 p.m.  

A newspaper report published over the weekend says a former official at the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services continued to work at the agency even after he faced allegations of sexual harassment.

Rick Kimpel / flickr Creative Commons

Health care officials say Kansas nursing homes are hesitant to take patients who need hospice care and who are waiting on Medicaid coverage because they may not get paid for the care they provide.

A backlog of Medicaid applications has been affecting Kansas nursing homes in recent years. Beneficiaries of Kansas' privatized Medicaid program, KanCare, wait months to see their applications approved while nursing homes provide care for which they aren't paid, the Topeka Capital-Journal reported.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

Inspectors arrived Tuesday at Osawatomie State Hospital to determine whether the state-run psychiatric facility can regain its federal certification and, with it, its Medicare funding.

Susan NYC / flickr, Creative Commons

Sedgwick County commissioners approved additional funding for a program that provides in-home services for older people who have limited physical abilities.

The Senior Care Act program will add two full-time positions in 2018. The program serves people 60 years old and older in Sedgwick, Butler and Harvey counties.

The program provides in-home help with personal care, meals, appointments, and light housework.

Annette Graham with the Sedgwick County Division on Aging says 170 seniors are receiving services, and another 200 are on a waiting list.

PHIL CAUTHON / KHI News Service/File photo

A Democratic candidate for Kansas governor says the Brownback administration is bent on privatizing a key mental health facility.

The Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services has unveiled a proposal to build a new mental hospital at Osawatomie, which a Tennessee company would run.

But Kansas House Minority Leader Jim Ward says the agency should be exploring in-house options.

"This administration has a terrible history of privatization. Whether it be child support collection, DCF, KanCare,” Ward says.

PHIL CAUTHON / KHI News Service/File photo

Staff at Kansas’ troubled Osawatomie State Hospital got a first glimpse Tuesday at a proposal to privatize it.

The staff want to know what type of therapies the mental health facility would offer if privatized, and whether it would turn people away who don’t have insurance.

The Tennessee company that wants to operate it says it would not.

But there are other questions, too, about staff pay and pensions.

Lisa Edmonds, flickr Creative Commons

An agency that helps older adults navigate life transitions is adjusting to meet current and future needs in the community.

The Central Plains Area Agency on Aging serves people aged 60 years and older in Sedgwick, Butler and Harvey counties.

The agency says it’s noticing a change when it comes to nutrition programs offered in the tri-county area.

Agency executive director Annette Graham says more seniors are using a home-delivery meal program instead of going to community sites where meals are offered.

Meg Wingerter / Kansas News Service

Editor’s note: Kansas privatized its foster care system in 1997, after a lawsuit revealed widespread problems. Twenty years later, the number of Kansas children in foster care has shot up — by a third in just the last five years — and lawmakers are debating whether the system once again needs serious changes. The Kansas News Service investigated problems in the system and possible solutions. This is the third story in a series.

Pages