Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services

http://www.kdads.ks.gov

Workers from the Larned State Hospital say staffing shortages have created difficult and unsafe working conditions at the mental facility. Two employees told a legislative committee yesterday about the challenges they face.

Kyle Nuckolls says staff often work 12- to 16-hour shifts multiple days in a row at the western Kansas facility and they can’t take time off for family emergencies or illness. He says the long shifts lead to worker mistakes and other challenges.

http://www.kdads.ks.gov

A health care consultant with experience in hospital turnarounds will take over the top job at Larned State Hospital for the next six months. The Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services announced Wednesday that Chris Mattingly will serve as interim superintendent of the facility.

The announcement comes on the heels of the resignation of former superintendent for the hospital Tom Kinlen. Larned faces ongoing challenges in hiring and retaining staff; earlier this year, internal reports found that employees racked up significant overtime hours.

Brownback Names Interim KDADS Secretary

Dec 11, 2015

Gov. Sam Brownback on Thursday named Tim Keck as interim secretary of the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services.

Keck will fill the vacancy created when Kari Bruffett leaves to work as director of policy for the Kansas Health Institute, parent organization of the editorially independent KHI News Service.

Kari Bruffett, secretary of the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services, has announced plans to resign at the end of the year.

Gov. Sam Brownback said Monday in a release that Bruffett's resignation is effective December 31. Bruffett was named KDADS secretary in May 2014. She previously had been director of the Health Care Finance division of the state Department of Health and Environment.

Bruffett is leaving her position leading KDADS to join the Kansas Health Institute as director of policy.

The agency that oversees programs for seniors and Kansans with disabilities no longer has interim leadership.

Kari Bruffett was confirmed Thursday as secretary of the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services. Jim McClean has more...

http://www.kdads.ks.gov

The state of Kansas has a special program to help some people who have suffered serious brain injuries. It's a part of the Medicaid program, but is managed under a waiver from the federal government. That waiver is up for renewal, some people are concerned that access to the program may be cut back.

Is Kansas Short-Changing The Disabled?

Oct 29, 2013

A Kansas advocacy group says the state has failed to comply with targets for delivering services to developmentally disabled people for years.

The Disability Rights Center says 3,300 developmentally disabled Kansans who qualify for Medicaid services continue to be denied aid.

The DRC says number of vacancies has grown each of the past four years.

And these vacancies have contributed to people having to wait up to five years to start receiving home- and community-based aid.

Kan. Plans Events On Medicaid Changes For Disabled

Sep 17, 2013

Kansas officials have scheduled four meetings next week to discuss how people with disabilities will be affected when they're included in an overhaul of the state's Medicaid program.

The Department for Aging and Disability Services says the meetings are intended for physically and developmentally disabled Kansans, their families and groups that provided services. The sessions will give those parties a chance to ask questions about the overhaul.

As of Monday, properly licensed firearms will be allowed in all state office buildings, except those exempted by law.

The new law stipulates that concealed carry is permitted in any state or municipal building unless the building has adequate security measures to make sure no weapons are allowed inside.

State correctional facilities, courtrooms and law enforcement agencies are generally exempt from the new law.

Some state health care facilities and post-secondary educational facilities have asked for temporary exemptions from the law.