Kansas gun laws

Bryan Thompson / Heartland Health Monitor

About 60 people showed up for a public forum at Kansas State University yesterday on how best to implement a new state law that will allow concealed carry of handguns on university campuses in Kansas next July.

Kansas lawmakers — at least the majority of incumbents — think college campuses will be safer starting next July. That’s when a law they approved will allow people to carry concealed handguns on Kansas Board of Regents campuses.

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Kansas colleges and universities are preparing for the summer of 2017. That's when they will have to start allowing students, staff and faculty members to carry concealed guns on campus.

Schools can opt out of this policy, but only if they spend millions of dollars to upgrade security measures.

One survey showed a majority of university employees opposed the idea of allowing guns on campus.

Hugo Phan / KMUW/File photo

Democrats in the Kansas Legislature have introduced a bill that would allow colleges and universities to continue banning concealed guns on campus. State law allows concealed firearms in most public buildings that don't have adequate security measures in place.

Universities have been exempt from that law but the exemption expires next year. This new proposal would give universities a permanent exemption. Democratic Senator Tom Holland says the state shouldn’t be dictating these policies.

Stephen Koranda file photo

The Kansas legislature passed bills at the end of the session that will raise the states sales tax and change the laws on carrying a concealed weapon. The new laws go into effect tomorrow, along with nearly 80 other laws that begin July 1.

The statewide sales tax will increase from 6.15 percent to 6.5 percent.

Taxes on cigarettes will also go up 50 cents a pack to $1.29.

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Update from AP: 

A proposal to allow Kansas residents to carry concealed firearms without a permit has won final approval from the Legislature.

The measure was headed to Republican Gov. Sam Brownback despite some lawmakers' misgivings about the state dropping its requirement that anyone seeking to carry a concealed firearm undergo at least eight hours of training.

Brownback's office didn't say what his plans are, but he's signed every other major gun-rights measure sent to him since taking office in January 2011.

WickedVT, flickr Creative Commons

A Kansas House committee has advanced a bill that would allow people over the age of 21 to carry a concealed firearm in Kansas without a permit. State law currently requires training and a background check before residents can carry a concealed gun.

Republican Representative Travis Couture-Lovelady says Kansans shouldn’t have to ask for permission from the government to exercise their 2nd Amendment rights.

“And I think the citizens of Kansas have proved that they are able to safely carry concealed without problems,” says Couture-Lovelady.

Auraelius, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Senate is considering a bill that would allow officials to ban concealed weapons in some areas of public buildings.

Currently, people carrying concealed weapons must be allowed to go anywhere in public buildings where the guns are allowed.

Legislation submitted by Republican Senator Forrest Knox of Altoona would allow officials to ban weapons from some parts of the buildings.

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt plans to have a public hearing in September on new regulations for signs that businesses and groups must post if they want to ban guns from their premises.

The hearing is set for Sept. 17 in the building near the Kansas Statehouse that houses the attorney general's office.

A state law that took effect this month makes the open carrying of guns legal across the state. But businesses and groups still can ban both concealed and unconcealed guns from their premises if they post signs.

A new Kansas gun law is being challenged in court. The Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, which is based in Washington, D.C., has filed a lawsuit against Kansas because of a new state law that declares guns made and kept in Kansas are exempt from federal gun laws.

The new state law is called the “Second Amendment Protection Act.”

A national gun-control group says it is planning to challenge a Kansas law declaring that the federal government has no authority to regulate guns that are manufactured, sold and kept only in the state.

The Washington-based Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence announced Monday that it would file a federal lawsuit against the state law.

The Kansas law was enacted in 2013 and makes it a felony for any U.S. government employee to attempt to enforce a federal regulation or treaty when it comes to Kansas-only firearms, ammunition or accessories.

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