Kansas gun laws

Auraelius, flickr Creative Commons

Update from AP: 

A proposal to allow Kansas residents to carry concealed firearms without a permit has won final approval from the Legislature.

The measure was headed to Republican Gov. Sam Brownback despite some lawmakers' misgivings about the state dropping its requirement that anyone seeking to carry a concealed firearm undergo at least eight hours of training.

Brownback's office didn't say what his plans are, but he's signed every other major gun-rights measure sent to him since taking office in January 2011.

WickedVT, flickr Creative Commons

A Kansas House committee has advanced a bill that would allow people over the age of 21 to carry a concealed firearm in Kansas without a permit. State law currently requires training and a background check before residents can carry a concealed gun.

Republican Representative Travis Couture-Lovelady says Kansans shouldn’t have to ask for permission from the government to exercise their 2nd Amendment rights.

“And I think the citizens of Kansas have proved that they are able to safely carry concealed without problems,” says Couture-Lovelady.

Auraelius, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Senate is considering a bill that would allow officials to ban concealed weapons in some areas of public buildings.

Currently, people carrying concealed weapons must be allowed to go anywhere in public buildings where the guns are allowed.

Legislation submitted by Republican Senator Forrest Knox of Altoona would allow officials to ban weapons from some parts of the buildings.

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt plans to have a public hearing in September on new regulations for signs that businesses and groups must post if they want to ban guns from their premises.

The hearing is set for Sept. 17 in the building near the Kansas Statehouse that houses the attorney general's office.

A state law that took effect this month makes the open carrying of guns legal across the state. But businesses and groups still can ban both concealed and unconcealed guns from their premises if they post signs.

A new Kansas gun law is being challenged in court. The Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, which is based in Washington, D.C., has filed a lawsuit against Kansas because of a new state law that declares guns made and kept in Kansas are exempt from federal gun laws.

The new state law is called the “Second Amendment Protection Act.”

A national gun-control group says it is planning to challenge a Kansas law declaring that the federal government has no authority to regulate guns that are manufactured, sold and kept only in the state.

The Washington-based Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence announced Monday that it would file a federal lawsuit against the state law.

The Kansas law was enacted in 2013 and makes it a felony for any U.S. government employee to attempt to enforce a federal regulation or treaty when it comes to Kansas-only firearms, ammunition or accessories.

Kan. Attorney Gen. Derek Schmidt is holding a meeting Wednesday, May 28, to discuss regulations for signs that people must post to keep guns off their premises. Schmidt's office is soliciting public input about what should be required for the new "no-gun signs."

Blake Facey / Flickr / Creative Commons

Hooray for Thundershirts! Our dog, Lucy, is deathly afraid of thunderstorms and firecracker pops. She would nervously pace the house every time a storm came or on the Fourth of July, virtually inconsolable, shaking and cowering until the noise stopped.

Then a friend told us about the Thundershirt. It’s basically a wrap-around for dogs that attaches with Velcro and somehow provides them the comfort they need to make it through the rumbles and explosions of our violent Kansas storms. The Thundershirt has saved the day for Lucy.

UPDATE : The Kansas Senate is expected to approve a bill that strips cities and counties of their power to regulate firearms and voids existing gun ordinances.

The bill facing a final vote today would ensure that the open carrying of firearms is legal across the state, though local officials could still prevent it inside public buildings.

The Kansas Senate will debate a bill on Tuesday that strips cities and counties of their power to regulate firearms.

The full Kansas House could consider a bill soon that voids local government firearm regulations.

A House committee amended and approved the legislation yesterday.

The bill would keep local governments from regulating the open carry of firearms.

Committee members added a provision saying Kansans could carry a loaded gun in their vehicle anywhere in the state, without requiring a concealed weapons permit. Now, local governments can bar keeping a loaded gun on your seat or in your glovebox.

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