Kansas Legislature

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service

A panel of Kansas lawmakers says the Legislature should follow through on promised funding for water projects across the state.

Dan Skinner / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

A new report in the Kansas City Star is once again raising concerns about a lack of transparency in Kansas state government.

Kansas News Service/File photo

Medicaid expansion advocates say Kansas policymakers should take notice of elections this week in Maine and Virginia.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Updated at 9:22 a.m. Tuesday

Kansas lawmakers soon will start work to determine their response to a ruling by the state’s Supreme Court that found K-12 public school funding unconstitutional.

Michael Coghlan, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas legislators expect to consider proposals next year to make it easier for people wrongfully convicted of major crimes to win compensation from the state following the third recent high-profile release of men exonerated after years in prison.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service

Kansas lawmakers considered tighter rules on payday lending during a committee meeting Wednesday, but they ultimately decided not to recommend more regulations for the short-term loans.

Orlin Wagner / AP

Last week the state lost again at the Kansas Supreme Court, which unanimously ruled that Kansas is underfunding its public schools, with repercussions for academically struggling children across the state — and especially for students and taxpayers who live in resource-poor school districts. 

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Wichita Public Schools officials say the Kansas Supreme Court ruling on Monday, which finds that the state’s school funding formula is unconstitutional, is a “positive thing for Kansas kids.”

Kansas Department of Corrections

Kansas corrections officials hope to have a contract signed before the end of the year to build a new prison in Lansing. The negotiations over that prison contract have been taking place behind closed doors.

Sam Zeff / KCUR

Despite the ongoing fight over how much Kansas should spend on schools, the Legislature did at least one thing this year that almost all educators were pleased with: For the first time, it included all-day kindergarten in the school funding formula.

That means districts no longer have to use money from other parts of their budgets or charge parents for all-day K.

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