Kansas News Service

The Kansas News Service produces essential enterprise reporting, diving deep and connecting the dots regarding the policies, issues and and events that affect the health of Kansans and their communities. The team is based at KCUR and collaborates with KMUW and public media stations across Kansas.

The Kansas News Service is made possible by a group of funding organizations, led by the Kansas Health Foundation. Other funders include United Methodist Health Ministry Fund, Sunflower Foundation, REACH Healthcare Foundation and the Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City. Additional support comes from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

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Ways to Connect

Nadya Faulx / KMUW, File Photo

Wichita businessman Willis “Wink” Hartman suspended his campaign for the Republican nomination for governor Wednesday, becoming the second candidate to exit the GOP race this month.

Crysta Henthorne / KCUR 89.3

Junkie logic brought an addict to the doorsteps of a Topeka woman once convicted of selling cocaine.

The addict was looking to buy, and Kansas’ online database of criminal offenders has a handy geographic search tool that lets users pull up the names, crimes and addresses of people who live within a few miles of their homes.

It’s meant to boost public safety, but the Kansas Sentencing Commission says other consequences come with publishing the past transgressions of nearly 20,000 Kansans.

Sean Sandefur / KMUW/File photo

The Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday is hosting a listening session in Kansas City on the Trump administration’s proposal to scrap the Obama-era Clean Power Plan.

One of only three scheduled nationwide, the listening session is expected to draw attendees from far away, and nearby.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

After several teenagers -- some not even from the state -- decided to run for Kansas governor, members of the House voted Tuesday to tighten requirements to run for statewide office. 

Candidates would have to be at least 18 years old and live in Kansas. Lawmakers debated whether to apply the rules to the 2018 election, but decided against that approach.

Republican Rep. Tom Cox says it sets a dangerous precedent to change the rules part way through an election cycle.

Kansas News Service/File photo

Executives pushing the merger of the two largest utility companies in Kansas have told regulators they’ll give in on some customer bill protection and job guarantees.

But the leaders at Great Plains Energy and Westar Energy say promising a five-year moratorium on rate hikes could leave the new, larger company unable to keep step in a fast-changing industry.

Neil Conway, flickr Creative Commons

Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee say Kansans wrongly convicted of crimes deserve to be compensated by the state. The panel amended and advanced a bill Monday that would do that using more than just cash.

USDA / flickr Creative Commons

Since its inception over a decade ago, the Department of Homeland Security has had authority over the $1.3 billion National Bio and Agro-defense Facility, or NBAF, under construction on the campus of Kansas State University.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

A crowded race for the Republican nomination for Kansas' next governor has candidates looking for ways to stand out.


The Kansas Water Office has received more than $2.5 million from the federal government to help fight harmful algae blooms in the state's largest lake. 

Kansas Geological Survey

Zack Pistora, legislative director of the Kansas Sierra Club, was worried about the number of earthquakes in the state and wanted to do something about it.

“Those earthquakes can cause damage to people’s homes, businesses, public buildings,” he said. “Right now there’s no recourse for those Kansans who get affected.”