Kansas Republican Party

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

If Kansas congressman Mike Pompeo is confirmed to the post of CIA director in the Trump administration, it will leave his House seat vacant.

Pompeo was recently re-elected to a fourth term in Congress. He beat out three challengers in the general election--Democrat Dan Giroux, independent Miranda Allen and Libertarian Gordon Bakken--and received 61 percent of the vote.

If the 4th Congressional District seat is vacated, it will be filled by a special election, explains Bryan Caskey, elections director with the Kansas secretary of state’s office.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

The Kansas GOP chairman says the party is already looking ahead to next year's races, including for school boards and city councils.

At a "victory party" in Wichita, Kelly Arnold said voters responded well to the Republican message all the way down the ballot this election. Several Sedgwick County Republican incumbents held their seats in the Legislature, including District 85 Rep. Chuck Weber, District 16 Sen. Ty Masterson and Senate President Susan Wagle.

donkeyhotey / Flickr / Creative Commons

Now that the registration deadline has passed, both parties in the state of Kansas are concentrating their efforts on getting out the vote.

With just weeks until the general election, both Republican and Democratic parties are encouraging their members to go to the polls.

Kerry Gooch, executive director of the Kansas Democratic Party, says that it's not just Democrats that he is concentrating on.

Heather Katsoulis / flickr Creative Commons

Kansas’ two main political parties are hoping voters work their way down the entire ballot on Nov. 8.

The Kansas Democratic Party has started a social media campaign called “Finish the Ballot" where they're encouraging voters to consider more races than just the one at the top of the ticket: the race for president.

Field and political director Cheyenne Davis says it’s often those down-ballot races that have the most impact on voters’ daily lives.

Abigail Wilson / KMUW

Going into Tuesday’s primaries, most political watchers believed conservatives would lose a few seats in the Kansas House but hold their own in the state Senate.

But by the end of the night, conservative Republicans across the state took a shellacking.

Courtesy Kelly Arnold

Kansas Republican Party Chairman Kelly Arnold says it has been an exciting week at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland leading up to GOP nominee Donald Trump's speech tonight.

donkeyhotey / Flickr / Creative Commons

A Bernie Sanders supporter in Wichita is still holding out hope for her candidate to somehow be nominated at the National Democratic Convention in July, but if not, she plans to vigorously help to secure local wins for Democrats. Republicans are also seeking committed volunteers to help invigorate their campaigns.

Die-hard Sanders supporter Carri New is a delegate being sent to the National Democratic Convention in July. She says if Bernie Sanders concedes, she will turn most of her attention to Kansas races.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

For the first time in more than 30 years, there's a Democrat running in every Senate district in Kansas. But their fellow left-leaning Kansans might not be voting for them in August.

That’s because some are so fed up with Gov. Sam Brownback, they’d rather switch parties to vote for a moderate Republican in the primary than allow the governor’s supporters to stay in the Legislature.

Hillary / flickr Creative Commons

A deadline is looming for Kansas voters who want to change political parties in time for the August primary election.

State law says voters can’t switch party affiliation for the primary after June 1. This is only the second election affected by the new party registration deadline.

Douglas County Clerk Jamie Shew says some voters were caught unaware two years ago.

“We had a number of people -especially in July because of the old registration deadline which happens in July- who were used to redeclaring a party and they couldn’t,” Shew says.

Kansas Republicans voted Saturday to leave support for the death penalty out of their party platform. It was the most contentious of the issues Republicans took up at their state convention in Topeka in anticipation of this year’s elections, which will decide the fate of all 125 House seats and 40 Senate seats in the state legislature.

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