Kansas tax plan

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A Kansas Senate committee has advanced a bill that would throw out the current state income tax brackets of 2.7 and 4.6 percent, so all taxpayers would pay the same 4.6 percent rate. The so-called "flat tax" plan would adjust deductions and credits, and lower the sales tax on food to try to limit the impact on lower-income Kansans. Jim Denning, the Senate’s Republican majority leader, says it still might need some adjustment.

“I think it’s just a starting point. We’re going to find out if there’s an interest in a single-tier tax plan,” Denning says.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

At a time when lawmakers are considering tax increases to help balance the budget, a proposal in the Kansas Senate would make it more difficult to raise taxes.

The proposed constitutional amendment would require a two-thirds vote by lawmakers for any tax increase, and it would cap state spending and revenue growth. To overcome that cap would require a public vote.

Republican Sen. Ty Masterson says the public should have more say when it comes to tax increases.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Kansas lawmakers are getting back to work on taxes quickly after taking a break. Leaders in the state Senate are planning to take up Gov. Sam Brownback's tax proposal Tuesday.

Brownback has proposed hiking Kansas tobacco and alcohol taxes and increasing business filing fees to help balance the state budget. Senate Majority Leader Jim Denning says they’ll debate the governor’s bill, even though they might not like the plan.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Gov. Sam Brownback and lawmakers are divided on a business tax exemption. Lawmakers sent the governor a bill repealing the exemption and raising other taxes to balance the budget, but Brownback vetoed it. The issue of business taxes might continue to be a sticking point in the tax debate.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

Kansas lawmakers are regrouping on the issue of taxes. This week, Gov. Sam Brownback vetoed a tax increase that would have helped balance the budget.

Kansas Senate leaders have been frustrated after Brownback announced he would veto the tax bill, which would have rolled back many of his signature 2012 tax cuts. 

“The House leadership and the Senate leadership asked the governor that if he was going to veto the bill, that he give us a budget plan that we can vote for in the House and the Senate," Senate President Susan Wagle said. "That didn’t come."

Stephen Koranda, File Photo / Kansas Public Radio

The Kansas Senate has approved a big tax increase to help balance the budget. That marks a potential roll back of much of Gov. Sam Brownback’s signature tax policy.

The House had previously approved the bill. The 22-18 Senate vote sends the plan to Republican Gov. Sam Brownback, where it could face a veto.

Stephen Koranda

The Kansas House has approved a bill that would undo many of the tax cuts passed in 2012. The 76-48 vote sends the plan to the Senate. The measure raises income tax rates and reinstates income taxes on hundreds of thousands of business owners. The chairman of the House tax committee, Republican Steven Johnson, says they have to balance tax cuts and funding government services.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

While one tax plan stalls in the Kansas Senate, another tax proposal makes headway in the Kansas House.

Thursday, the House tax committee advanced a bill that would eliminate an income tax exemption for business owners. It would also add a third income tax bracket and raise income tax rates.

Some Republicans say the income tax hikes are too steep for them to support. Others, like Republican Representative Melissa Rooker, say it would help with the state’s finances.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service

A Kansas Senate committee has advanced a bill that would repeal an income tax exemption for more than 300,000 business owners. That sends the proposal to the full Senate for consideration. The plan would also increase income tax rates overall.

Republican Sen. Julia Lynn supported the measure because she said the Legislature needs to make some progress on tax issues.

“This is a situation that has been floundering for four years. Although it might not be the best bill that’s put forward, it’s the beginning of a process,” Lynn said.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

A Kansas Senate committee started discussions on a bill Monday that would repeal a key piece of the 2012 tax cuts and raise personal income tax rates. A committee vote on the plan could come as soon as Tuesday.

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