Kris Kobach

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

After certifying the Kansas election results, Secretary of State Kris Kobach told reporters in Topeka this week he agrees with President-elect Donald Trump's unsubstantiated claim that ballots cast by non-citizens cost him the popular vote.

It comes as no surprise: Trump's assertion sounds like something that could have come from the secretary himself.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach says he supports President-elect Donald Trump’s claim that millions of illegal votes were cast in the election.

AP Photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach met with Donald Trump Sunday, and on Monday, reporters noticed a photo showing Kobach holding a plan for the Department of Homeland Security. That department has been rumored as one possible destination for Kobach if he joins the Trump administration.

The sheet of paper appears to outline potential policy proposals for DHS, including what it calls “extreme vetting” for immigrants from certain countries and construction of a border wall between the U.S. and Mexico. It also suggests blocking refugees from Syria.

Courtesy Claudia Amaro

Local activist and educator Claudia Amaro says people in Wichita's Latino community have concerns with the Trump administration being in power next year.

After last week's presidential election, Amaro says she is hearing from the community. She says kids have talked about being bullied at schools, parents are wondering whether to rethink buying a home here, and that there's more talk about a wall being built along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr / Creative Commons

Secretary of State Kris Kobach pushed for tighter voting laws in Kansas aimed at preventing voter fraud. He also was an early supporter of Donald Trump and has advised the campaign. KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports on what the Trump election could mean for voting laws like the ones in Kansas.

Stephen Koranda, file photo / KPR

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach says he’s serving on the transition team for President-elect Donald Trump, but Kobach says he’s not angling for a job in the Trump administration.

Right now, Kobach says his focus is helping Trump’s team develop immigration policy proposals.

“Trying to put together a to-do list for the Trump team when they take office in January. The first 100 days, what’s going to get done, what are the top priorities, what are the orders that things should occur,” Kobach says.

Kobach says he is open to the idea of working for Trump.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A judge has granted a permanent injunction in the ever-changing voter registration system in Kansas, but who must prove U.S. citizenship to vote, and who does not, are still questions floating in the air.

A temporary injunction has now become final. It's the much-litigated issue about registering to vote at DMVs with the federal form or at local elections offices.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

The number of Kansas voters not affiliated with the Democratic, Republican or Libertarian parties is growing.

Kansas remains a Republican stronghold: The GOP is the state’s largest party with 44 percent of the registered voters in the state.

The number of unaffiliated voters stands at about 30 percent, higher than the ranks of Democrats.

Secretary of State Kris Kobach said during a press conference Thursday that the number of unaffiliated voters has been growing in recent years, and the presidential race this year has sustained that trend.

Stephen Koranda, file photo / KPR

Secretary of State Kris Kobach says this election will break records in Kansas. Kobach predicts 72 percent of registered voters will cast ballots, a jump from 67 percent in 2012.

If his estimate rings true, that would be an all-time-high of 1.3 million votes.

Kobach says turnout is being driven by tight legislative races and what he calls an “unusual” presidential race.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A federal judge has revived a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a Kansas law requiring prospective voters to prove they are U.S. citizens.

U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson on Wednesday gave Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach a pass for failing to file a timely response to the lawsuit. She set aside a court clerk's default judgment issued last week against the state.

Robinson says the case is of constitutional significance and public interest, and that it deserves to be decided on the merits and not through procedural default.

Pages