Kris Kobach

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A federal judge has revived a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a Kansas law requiring prospective voters to prove they are U.S. citizens.

U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson on Wednesday gave Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach a pass for failing to file a timely response to the lawsuit. She set aside a court clerk's default judgment issued last week against the state.

Robinson says the case is of constitutional significance and public interest, and that it deserves to be decided on the merits and not through procedural default.

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A fight over the voter registration laws in Kansas is down to deadlines. Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s office missed a deadline in a lawsuit challenging the proof-of-citizenship requirement. As Stephen Koranda reports, that caused a judge to rule against Kobach.

Mark Johnson, one of the attorneys challenging the law, says they will oppose the judge accepting the document because Kobach was late with another filing already in the suit.

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Kansas' Secretary of State Kris Kobach has avoided a contempt of court hearing by striking a deal with the ACLU on Thursday. 

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

A Kansas judge has ordered Secretary of State Kris Kobach to notify thousands of people who hadn't provided documents proving their citizenship that they will be allowed to vote for all offices in the November election.

Shawnee County District Judge Larry Hendrick's order affects more than 19,545 voters who registered at motor vehicle offices or with a federal form without providing documentary proof of U.S. citizenship.

The judge stopped short of issuing the permanent injunction sought by the American Civil Liberties Union. Kobach's office says it is reviewing the ruling.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach has discarded as of August the registrations of about 6,570 prospective voters under a rule that allows him to purge them after 90 days primarily for lack of proof of citizenship, the League of Women Voters said Tuesday.

Those prospective voters whose names are missing likely registered at some place other than a motor vehicle office and so their right to vote is not protected by recent court orders compelling Kobach to keep them on the rolls. They would need to register again in order to vote in November.

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Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach will head to court again this week in a lawsuit over the state’s voter registration laws. At issue are thousands of people who registered to vote at the DMV but did not provide a proof-of-citizenship document required under Kansas law.

After a federal court ruling earlier this year, Kobach said those Kansas DMV voters could only cast ballots in federal races; their votes in state races would not be counted.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Updated 9/12/16:

The Sedgwick County Election office in Wichita may have another set of changes to deal with. A federal appeals court Friday blocked Kansas, Georgia and Alabama from requiring residents to prove that they are U.S. citizens on a national registration form.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Computer hackers recently targeted voter data in Arizona and Illinois, but Kansas election officials say they're confident state data is secure. Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s office is responsible for the security of voter registration records.

“We have a layer of security that protects our voter rolls that those states did not have. I’m not going to state specifically what it is, but it is a significant one,” Kobach says.

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Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach says he’s still advising Donald Trump's presidential campaign. He also hailed Trump's latest speech on immigration.

Kobach says Trump brought up issues like wage suppression caused by illegal immigration that often aren’t included in speeches.

“It was historic in the sense that I can’t remember a president or a presidential candidate in my lifetime giving a speech about immigration with that much detail or that much content in it,” Kobach says.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Only 73 of an estimated 17,000 voters affected by recent court rulings cast ballots in the Kansas primary election. Those Kansans registered to vote at the DMV but didn’t provide a citizenship document required under state law.

Secretary of State Kris Kobach and other state officials certified the election results on Thursday. Kobach believes the turnout was so low because many of those affected voters may have already moved.