Kris Kobach

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

There’s a legal challenge underway to a new state regulation that would throw out some votes cast by thousands of Kansans. It affects people who registered to vote at the DMV but didn’t turn in a citizenship document required under Kansas law.

The rule says nearly 20,000 Kansans with a suspended voter registration would be allowed to cast ballots, but only their votes in federal races would be counted.

Becky McCray / flickr Creative Commons

Ever since the Kansas Secure and Fair Elections Act went into effect in 2013, there has been a seemingly endless string of legal battles over its legitimacy. The controversial law requires people to provide proof of citizenship when registering to vote. It was authored by Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who believes the law protects Kansas from fraudulent voting.

Here, a look into the wonderful world of state and federal lawsuits to find out how the SAFE Act may affect upcoming elections in Kansas.

A judge will hear arguments on whether to block the two-tiered voting system in Kansas just days before the primary election.

Shawnee County District Judge Larry Hendricks has set a July 29 hearing in Topeka on the American Civil Liberties Union's request for a temporary restraining order. The primary is Aug. 2.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach has championed laws restricting voting that are rippling across the country. The conservative Republican argues the tough laws on voting eligibility are needed to protect elections against fraud, but critics contend such restrictions are unnecessary and suppress voter turnout, particularly among the young and minority voters.

Arizona enacted the nation's first proof of citizenship law in 2004, followed by similar laws in Kansas, Georgia and Alabama.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

The ACLU has filed a lawsuit against Kris Kobach over a dual voting process they say is illegal. The current system in place for Kansas elections would allow thousands of suspended voters to cast ballots only in federal elections, but not state or local ones.

A federal court ruling in May stated that forcing someone to provide a birth certificate or passport when registering to vote at motor vehicle offices violates federal law. The judge ordered Kansas to register roughly 17,000 suspended voters.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Republican Party leaders have been crafting their platform ahead of the GOP convention in Cleveland next week. Delegates will decide whether or not to adopt the platform that includes opposition to same-sex marriage.

Among the proposed planks is one calling for a reversal of the U.S. Supreme Court decision last year that legalized same-sex unions in all 50 states.

U.S. Dept. of Justice [Public domain] / Wikimedia Commons

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach has been helping craft the party platform at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. The GOP delegate had some significant influence on the document.

The platform is a series of policy idea and goals drafted by party officials that will be presented to the full GOP convention next week.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

A federal appeals court will hear oral arguments in September in an appeal that could affect the voting rights of thousands of voters in Kansas, Georgia and Alabama in upcoming elections.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia on Thursday set a Sept. 8 hearing date in the case of a U.S. election official who without public notice required documentary proof of citizenship on a national voter registration form used by residents of the three states.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

This post was updated on Tuesday at 12:21 p.m.

With little notice, a state panel has approved a temporary election rule that will have some Kansans vote with provisional ballots, but only their votes in federal races will be counted. Votes for state and local races will be tossed out.

Gage Skidmore, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas taxpayers have been picking up the tab for state officials and legislators to fly in the state-owned executive aircraft to attend out-of-state sports events and take trips with family and friends, according to documents obtained by The Associated Press.

Government officials appear to have no qualms about their own travel in the state's nine-passenger Raytheon King Air 350, despite Kansas' budget crunch that has led the governor to criticize schools for spending too much and lawmakers in the GOP-majority Statehouse to accuse poor people of spending welfare money on cruises.

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