Kris Kobach

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

The American Civil Liberties Union says Kansas is violating federal law by requiring new voters to prove their citizenship when registering to vote at the DMV.

The ACLU has filed a lawsuit arguing that the state's requirements are blocking people from registering.

Micah Kubic, with the ACLU of Kansas, says they’re asking the court to block the proof-of-citizenship requirement at DMV offices.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

The Sedgwick County Elections Office has received instructions from the Kansas Secretary of State’s office to adhere to a new voting rule put in place last week.

The decision was made by the new executive director of the U.S. Elections Assistance Commission.

According to the Secretary of State's office, the decision means Kansas residents can no longer register to vote using a federal form without providing proof of citizenship, such as a birth certificate.

In most other states, no such documentation is needed to register; voters need only sign a sworn statement.

Chris Murphy, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas secretary of state's office issued a report today on the status of business growth in the state. There were signs of growth--and signs of decline.

Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s office noted that a record of nearly 17,300 businesses formed in Kansas last year. His office reported that Kansas had about 179,000 businesses at the end of 2015, roughly 8,600 more than at the end of 2014.

Those new ventures helped fuel the state’s overall business growth in 2015, which was up 5 percent.

Ho John Lee / Flickr

A bill in the Kansas Legislature would allow people to register to vote and cast a ballot the same day, a move supporters say would increase voter turnout but that opponents say raises concerns about fraud.

Same-day registration is allowed in 10 states and the District of Columbia, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Under current Kansas law, voters have to be registered at least 21 days before an election.

Carla Eckels

Secretary of State Kris Kobach is proposing to have Kansas counties audit voting results immediately after the state's primary and general elections.

Kobach outlined a measure Monday that would require all counties to manually audit 1 percent of their election returns, starting with state elections in 2018. The Kansas House Elections Committee agreed to sponsor his proposal as a bill.

The Republican secretary of state said the measure is a response to calls for his office to allow private parties to audit election equipment. He said state law doesn't currently allow it.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach will pursue three more cases of voter fraud for alleged double voting. Kobach discussed the cases during a meeting at the Statehouse yesterday.

The three new cases come from Johnson, Ellis and Sedgwick Counties. In all three, the people are accused of voting more than once in an election.

Democratic state Rep. Tom Sawyer told Kobach that it doesn’t seem like voter fraud to him if someone voted twice when they thought they could and didn’t have criminal intent. Kobach says it’s important to prosecute the crimes.

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach says he has no plans at this time to ask lawmakers to ban voters who use a federal form to register from casting ballots in state and local elections.

Kobach said Wednesday that he believes a judge made legal errors when he ruled last week in favor of voters who challenged his office's "dual registration" system. He says he may appeal or ask the judge to reconsider.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

A Kansas judge has ruled that Secretary of State Kris Kobach has no legal right to bar people who register to vote using a federal form from voting in local and state elections.

Shawnee County District Judge Franklin Theis ruled Friday in favor of two Kansas voters who challenged how Kobach is enforcing a state proof-of-citizenship requirement for registering to vote.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

Lawyers for two northeast Kansas voters have temporarily withdrawn a request for a court order blocking the state from enforcing registration restrictions.

U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson canceled a hearing scheduled Friday in the federal lawsuit after the request was withdrawn Thursday.

Wikimedia Commons

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is defending his participation in a conference organized by a group that's been called "anti-immigrant."

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