Kris Kobach

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Secretary of State Kris Kobach wants lawmakers to give him the authority to create a two-tiered voting system in Kansas. That would mean people who register to vote at the DMV and don’t provide a citizenship document, as required under state law, would only be allowed to vote in federal races.

Kansas voter registration laws still require proof of citizenship, but federal courts have ruled that the state can’t require such proof when people register to vote at the DMV or when they use a federal registration form. Kobach says that bypasses the state’s voter registration rules.

Wikimedia Commons

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is asking the Legislature to give him authority to bar potentially tens of thousands of people from casting votes in state or local races.

The Lawrence Journal World reported the Republican asked a Senate committee Tuesday for legislation giving him power to hold "bifurcated" elections in Kansas.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach continues with his prosecution of alleged voter fraud. Peggy Lowe with the Kansas News Service reports that he’s expected to file a ninth case today.

A spokeswoman from Kobach’s office says the new voter fraud case is being filed in Shawnee County in Topeka.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach asked a federal court Thursday to order the state to release to him a list of about 21,000 people who have temporary driver's licenses in an apparent effort to bolster his claims that noncitizens are voting.

The move comes in a civil lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union challenging a Kansas law requiring documentary proof of citizenship to register to vote.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

After certifying the Kansas election results, Secretary of State Kris Kobach told reporters in Topeka this week he agrees with President-elect Donald Trump's unsubstantiated claim that ballots cast by non-citizens cost him the popular vote.

It comes as no surprise: Trump's assertion sounds like something that could have come from the secretary himself.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach says he supports President-elect Donald Trump’s claim that millions of illegal votes were cast in the election.

AP Photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach met with Donald Trump Sunday, and on Monday, reporters noticed a photo showing Kobach holding a plan for the Department of Homeland Security. That department has been rumored as one possible destination for Kobach if he joins the Trump administration.

The sheet of paper appears to outline potential policy proposals for DHS, including what it calls “extreme vetting” for immigrants from certain countries and construction of a border wall between the U.S. and Mexico. It also suggests blocking refugees from Syria.

Courtesy Claudia Amaro

Local activist and educator Claudia Amaro says people in Wichita's Latino community have concerns with the Trump administration being in power next year.

After last week's presidential election, Amaro says she is hearing from the community. She says kids have talked about being bullied at schools, parents are wondering whether to rethink buying a home here, and that there's more talk about a wall being built along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Gage Skidmore / flickr Creative Commons

Secretary of State Kris Kobach pushed for tighter voting laws in Kansas aimed at preventing voter fraud. He also was an early supporter of Donald Trump and has advised the campaign. KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports on what the Trump election could mean for voting laws like the ones in Kansas.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach says he’s serving on the transition team for President-elect Donald Trump, but Kobach says he’s not angling for a job in the Trump administration.

Right now, Kobach says his focus is helping Trump’s team develop immigration policy proposals.

“Trying to put together a to-do list for the Trump team when they take office in January. The first 100 days, what’s going to get done, what are the top priorities, what are the orders that things should occur,” Kobach says.

Kobach says he is open to the idea of working for Trump.

Pages