Kris Kobach

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

A Kansas judge has ruled that Secretary of State Kris Kobach has no legal right to bar people who register to vote using a federal form from voting in local and state elections.

Shawnee County District Judge Franklin Theis ruled Friday in favor of two Kansas voters who challenged how Kobach is enforcing a state proof-of-citizenship requirement for registering to vote.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

Lawyers for two northeast Kansas voters have temporarily withdrawn a request for a court order blocking the state from enforcing registration restrictions.

U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson canceled a hearing scheduled Friday in the federal lawsuit after the request was withdrawn Thursday.

Wikimedia Commons

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is defending his participation in a conference organized by a group that's been called "anti-immigrant."

A Colorado prosecutor says her office does not plan to file any charges against a man who allegedly voted in Kansas after doing so Colorado.

Yuma County District Attorney Brittny Lewton said Friday that Lincoln L. Wilson did not commit perjury or voter fraud because he voted first in Colorado. She says it did not become fraud until he went to Kansas several days later and cast a second ballot, and any perjury and double voting occurred in Kansas.

Lewton says her office conducted an investigation, and sent Kansas its findings.

Marc Nozell, flickr Creative Commons; kslegislature.org

There’s recently been a war of words between Republican Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and Democrat Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign. KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports.

Kobach put in place a new rule that cancels incomplete Kansas voter registrations after 90 days. Clinton’s campaign calls that a “full-court press” of voting restrictions. The campaign says Clinton wants automatic voter registration and more early voting opportunities.

Kansas has seen its number of incomplete voter registrations decline by nearly 6,700 in less than two weeks as counties follow a directive from Secretary of State Kris Kobach to cull their records.

Kobach's office said Tuesday that the state had about 31,000 incomplete registrations as of Tuesday, compared to about 37,700 when the Republican secretary of state's directive took effect on Oct. 2. The decline is nearly 18 percent.

File photo

Staff in Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s office say they have filed criminal charges related to voting crimes. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, these are the first three cases brought by the by secretary of state after his office was granted the power to prosecute.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

County election officials in Kansas could be nearly done with canceling more than 31,000 incomplete voter registrations when a federal judge has the next hearing in a lawsuit challenging the effort.

via Paul Davis' Facebook profile

The Kansas Republican Party is calling for Paul Davis to withdraw from a lawsuit over voter registration.

Davis, a former Democratic candidate for governor, is challenging a rule that cancels incomplete voter registrations after 90 days. He’s also challenging the underlying proof of citizenship requirement in Kansas law that has put thousands of voter registrations on hold.

Stephen Koranda

County election officials in Kansas are beginning to implement a new rule that cancels incomplete voter registrations after 90 days. The rule faces a legal challenge, but a court last week declined to put it on hold. The secretary of state’s office recommends registrations that have now been incomplete for more than 90 days be canceled.


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