Marginalia

Marginalia is an on-air commentary and podcast hosted by KMUW's Beth Golay. Each episode features author interviews, editorial commentary and other marginalia to enhance the reading experience.

The Marginalia podcast is also available through iTunes and through Google Play.

This episode was a bit of a departure to me. It features an interview I had recently with Kate DiCamillo about her book, Raymie Nightingale.

This episode features an interview I had recently with Candice Millard. Millard is not a typical historian. Her books tend to focus on the lesser-known moments in history. Teddy Roosevelt in the Amazon after his presidency, what really killed James Garfield, and her latest book, Hero of the Empire: The Boer War, a Daring Escape, and the Making of Winston Churchill. I asked Millard where she comes up with the ideas for her books. 

Here’s our conversation:

If you listened to the Marginalia commentary on-air, this is what you heard:

This episode features an interview I had this week with Marie Benedict. Her book, The Other Einstein, is a historical novel about Mileva Einstein, who was not only Albert’s first wife, but was also his scientific partner. 

Marginalia: Nathan Hill

Oct 14, 2016

This episode features a conversation I had recently with Nathan Hill about his book, The Nix

In Norwegian folklore, the Nix is a water spirit--the stories of which were used to pass along lessons from generation to generation. In his modern-day novel, The Nix delivers a somewhat modern-day moral. 

Corby Kelly

This episode features an interview I had recently with Benjamin Rybeck. His book, The Sadness, focuses on two central characters, twin brother and sister, Max and Kelly. 

Marginalia: Amor Towles

Sep 16, 2016
David Jacobs

This episode features an interview I had recently with Amor Towles. His  first book, Rules of Civility, was a novel layered in the opulence of society. The theme is repeated in his second novel--A Gentleman in Moscow--but this time it turns to Russia during its transition to the Stalinist Era. After the Russian Revolution, Count Alexander Rostov--the gentleman of the title--is placed under house arrest at the Hotel Metropol and for the next 3 decades must decide whether he will master his circumstances, or be mastered by them.

Here’s our conversation:

This episode features a conversation I had recently with Elizabeth J. Church about her book, The Atomic Weight of Love

Church was born in Los Alamos, New Mexico, after her parents relocated there. Her father, a research chemist, was drafted to work in secret on the Manhattan Project, and her mother sacrificed her career in biology to support his pursuit of scientific research. While Church’s novel is not her family’s story, their lives were certainly similar.

Philippe Matsas

This episode of Marginalia features a conversation I had recently with Rebecca Makkai. Although she’s best known for her novels, Rebecca has been writing short stories throughout her career. Many of those stories were recently published as a collection titled Music for Wartime.

Michael Lionstar

This episode of Marginalia features a conversation I had recently with Pauls Toutonghi, a writer primarily known for his novels, Red Weather and Evel Knievel Days,  and lately for his non-fiction--essays in Literary Hub, The New Yorker, and in The New York Times ‘Modern Love’ column. His newest book is also non-fiction. At the surface, Dog Gone tells the story of a very special golden retriever mix named Gonker who is lost on the Appalachian Trail. The book chronicles not only his in-laws' efforts to find Gonker, but also the root of his mother-in-law's drive.

Pauls stopped by the KMUW studios recently to chat with me about Dog Gone. Here’s our conversation.


 

This episode features a conversation I had recently with David Olimpio, an essayist whose prose is so lyrical he’s often labeled a poet. We spoke about his new book, This is Not a Confession. In it, David tackles some pretty intense themes: the sexual abuse inflicted by his babysitter; the death of his mother; his open marriage.

Essays in general are revealing…. exposing... divulging. But--as the title implies--David’s are not confessional. He’s not asking for pity. He doesn’t want forgiveness. If he’s looking for anything from the reader, perhaps it’s an attempt at understanding.

I think readers will agree that these essays are beautifully written. And I think David will agree, that he wrote these essays for himself.

Here’s our conversation.


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