Medicaid expansion

Bryan Thompson / Kansas News Service/File photo

KanCare expansion advocates are already setting their sights on potential future state lawmakers in their push to get expansion legislation passed next year.

Kansas News Service/File photo

Medicaid expansion advocates say Kansas policymakers should take notice of elections this week in Maine and Virginia.

Stephen Koranda

An advocacy group for Kansans over 60 will continue to push for Medicaid expansion. 

The Silver Haired Legislature targeted expanding Medicaid as a goal for the next Kansas legislative session.

Don Woodard, one of the group’s leaders, says there are thousands of Kansans between the ages of 60 and 65 who fall into a coverage gap. They aren’t old enough to qualify for Medicare, but they make too much to qualify for Medicaid right now.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Among Republicans vying to be Kansas’s next governor, Mark Hutton is on the conservative side. But he says he’s open to expanding KanCare, the state’s privatized Medicaid program.

Courtesy Kansas Health Institute

Low-income Kansans are much less likely to have health insurance than their counterparts in other states, according to an analysis of new data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

U.S. Census Bureau

The uninsured rates in Kansas and Missouri continue to drop, but not as fast as those in states that have expanded their Medicaid programs.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

There’s a crowded field of candidates running or considering the race for Kansas governor in 2018, and that means they’ll need to find ways to set themselves apart.

expandkancare.com

Two town hall forums are scheduled in Wichita and Hutchinson to discuss the latest health care policy developments in Washington, D.C., and Kansas.

Members of the Alliance for a Healthy Kansas will discuss how policy change at the state level and the national level can impact Kansans.

David Jordan, executive director of the Alliance for a Healthy Kansas, says the discussion will include how Kansas can expand KanCare, the state's Medicaid program, which would bring in $1.9 million a day to provide health coverage to 150,000 Kansans.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

It took 113 days instead of the scheduled 100, but Kansas lawmakers finally ended their 2017 session Saturday.

Kansas News Service/File photo

Another poll has found strong majorities of Kansans support expanding Medicaid, but some political experts say it isn’t likely to make a difference this legislative session.

The latest Medicaid expansion poll found about 68 percent of Kansans surveyed said they supported expanding the program to non-disabled adults who earn up to 138 percent of the federal poverty line, or annual income of about $16,600 for an individual and $33,400 for a family of four. About 60 percent of Republicans polled said they also supported expansion.

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