nursing homes

Susan NYC / flickr, Creative Commons

Officials say the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services is on track to fall short of federal requirements for inspection of 350 nursing home facilities that receive Medicare or Medicaid funding.

The Topeka Capital-Journal reports that the agency's compliance record for annual inspections has grown worse since 2015, when state employees completed surveys at nearly 80 percent of the state's nursing facilities.

Only 35 percent were inspected in 2017 and the state is on pace to conduct less than 40 percent for 2018.

Heartland Health Monitor/File photo

Kansas officials have received a court order Friday to expedite their takeover of 15 financially troubled nursing homes. State regulators say they need to move quickly to protect hundreds of elderly and disabled Kansans who reside in the facilities.

Susan NYC / flickr, Creative Commons

Kansas officials are moving to protect more than 800 vulnerable residents of 15 financially troubled nursing homes across the state.

The Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services is seeking court orders to put the facilities — currently operated by a New Jersey company — into receivership.

That would allow another company to take over operations pending arrangements to either sell the homes or close them.

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

Nursing homes in Kansas find themselves in crisis, say the people who run them.

Rick Kimpel / flickr Creative Commons

Health care officials say Kansas nursing homes are hesitant to take patients who need hospice care and who are waiting on Medicaid coverage because they may not get paid for the care they provide.

A backlog of Medicaid applications has been affecting Kansas nursing homes in recent years. Beneficiaries of Kansas' privatized Medicaid program, KanCare, wait months to see their applications approved while nursing homes provide care for which they aren't paid, the Topeka Capital-Journal reported.

Mabel Lamour/Belma/ReineMab / flickr Creative Commons

Kansas inspectors failed to follow up on nearly half the problems they found in 79 nursing homes across the state in 2014, according to a federal report issued Monday.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General report is part of a review of state agencies that inspect nursing homes that receive Medicare and Medicaid.

Watchdog: KS Nursing Home Requirements Too Weak

Sep 11, 2013

A nursing home watchdog group says Kansas nursing home residents would benefit from increased requirements for direct care from nurses and nurse-aides in nursing homes. Current regulations require adequate staffing to provide each resident a minimum of two hours of direct care daily.

Topeka Nursing Home Sues To Stay In Business

Jul 19, 2013

The owners of a Topeka nursing home have filed a federal lawsuit in attempt to stay in business. State and federal officials have decided to cancel the nursing home's eligibility for Medicare and Medicaid payments, and revoke its operating license.