nursing homes

Rick Kimpel / flickr Creative Commons

Health care officials say Kansas nursing homes are hesitant to take patients who need hospice care and who are waiting on Medicaid coverage because they may not get paid for the care they provide.

A backlog of Medicaid applications has been affecting Kansas nursing homes in recent years. Beneficiaries of Kansas' privatized Medicaid program, KanCare, wait months to see their applications approved while nursing homes provide care for which they aren't paid, the Topeka Capital-Journal reported.

Mabel Lamour/Belma/ReineMab / flickr Creative Commons

Kansas inspectors failed to follow up on nearly half the problems they found in 79 nursing homes across the state in 2014, according to a federal report issued Monday.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General report is part of a review of state agencies that inspect nursing homes that receive Medicare and Medicaid.

A nursing home watchdog group says Kansas nursing home residents would benefit from increased requirements for direct care from nurses and nurse-aides in nursing homes. Current regulations require adequate staffing to provide each resident a minimum of two hours of direct care daily.

The owners of a Topeka nursing home have filed a federal lawsuit in attempt to stay in business. State and federal officials have decided to cancel the nursing home's eligibility for Medicare and Medicaid payments, and revoke its operating license.