photography

Lamphouse Photo Co.

Some of my most treasured photographs come from two local photo booths: Lamphouse Photo Co. and Linnebur & Miller. These are two distinctly different operations, but both provide unconventional experiences for truly remarkable photographs.

Sally Mann’s exhibition of photographs of her children brought her persecution. She was accused of exploitation because of the naked images she produced of them at their remote Virginia home.

But now, in her beguiling memoir Hold Still, she is on display on her own terms. Mann relates her life as an artist, a southerner, a mother, daughter and wife. Scrupulously illustrated with her own photographs, plus journals and mementos she found cleaning out her parents’ attic, the book draws you completely into the world of a thoughtful, articulate, funny and generous woman.

Courtesy photo

    

The Wichita Art Museum has unveiled their newest exhibition Photographic Wonders: American Daguerreotypes from the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. A Daguerreotype is one of the earliest forms of photography. Invented in France by Louis Daguerre in 1839, Daguerre revolutionized scientific observation as well as art. He discovered how to fix an image on to a silver plate with out it fading away – something his predecessors had not yet solved.

Image courtesy of The Kansas African American Museum

The Kansas African American Museum opened a new show this past weekend commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Freedom Summer of 1964.

Richard Ross

There are about 70,000 young people in juvenile detention centers or correctional faculties in the United States. Richard Ross spent the past seven years documenting the lives of American juveniles who have been housed in these facilities that treat, confine, punish, assist, and, occasionally, harm them. The culmination of this work is a project titled Juvenile in Justice at the Ulrich Museum of Art at Wichita State University.

The Ulrich Museum’s exhibition Juvenile in Justice presents the award–winning work of photographer Richard Ross.

Toni Parks / The Gordon Parks Foundation

The art world tends to lull during the summer. But around this time, as (hopefully) cooler temperatures approach, that lull grows into quiet anticipation as the museums, galleries, and other art institutions begin to turn up the heat with heavy-hitting fall exhibitions.

As Wichita enters into the fall season, there are some changes to the local art scene. Regrettably, some key contemporary art galleries have lost their spaces, most notably Tangent Lab and NakedCity Gallery.

CityArts is currently showing the work of photographer Gerald Hill in the solo exhibition Black and White Photography from Gerald Hill.  Hill’s practice spans over 30 years. During this time, he gained representation through galleries in Dallas, Kansas City, Santa Fe, and Topeka. The camera manufacturer Canon has awarded and licensed his photographic work on the National Park System as well.