Richard Crowson Commentary

Politicians can run but they cannot hide from political cartoonist (and banjo player) Richard Crowson and his watchdog, Al. Tune in on alternate Wednesdays to hear the latest.

Scott Beale, flickr Creative Commons

We’re careening towards Christmas! I adore this season in part because it’s one of those times when people behave in dramatically uncharacteristic ways. Stone-faced, no-nonsense types suddenly put bright lights on their rooftops! Guys that look like “Dog, the Bounty Hunter” can be seen contemplating assorted, delicate fragrances at Yankee Candle stores! Little old ladies in tattered coats with overdue utility bills put dollars into Salvation Army kettles!! The holidays seem to brighten human...

http://www.treesforlife.org

It’s late November and sandwiched tightly between our travel plans, meal preparation, shopping delirium and inevitable family drama, hopefully, will come a few moments of gratitude. We do have, after all, an entire day designated for it. One person I know doesn’t have any problem opening himself up to feelings of gratitude. He doesn’t view the glass as simply half full, but rather, he marvels at the wonder of the glass itself. And that may be because he knows so well that there are so many...

Well, Baby, I’m sad, and I’m down
‘Cause I’m progressive but I live in a conservative town
My next door neighbor’s just the nicest guy you ever could meet
But he’s a deep...

Richard Crowson

There’s a creeping, ghoulish specter out there haunting the state of Kansas this Halloween. The green, misty tentacles of its hot, fetid breath are curling and twining around us and even entering the very ears of Kansans everywhere. It’s called dark money. The secretive spending by special interest groups during this election season has led to Kansas being the state with the “highest percentage of TV ads paid for by secretive outside money,” according to a recent story in the Wichita Eagle....

Pity poor Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach . He finds himself recently in the unenviable situation of having to argue against his own intentions. Here is a man who has spent years working feverishly to keep certain people from voting. Wednesday, a study was released by the U.S. Government Accounting Office , concluding that his efforts have been successful. Kansas voter turnout was lessened more between 2008 and 2012 than it was in five states, which had no changes in their voter I.D....

DonkeyHotey, flickr Creative Commons

Let me just say that as a political cartoonist, I love having the Republican elephant and Democratic donkey symbols to work with. They are so universally understood that I notice when speaking to elementary school students that by the ages of 9 or 10, most of them know what the elephant and the donkey stand for. Thanks to mid-19th century cartoonist icon Thomas Nast for inventing the Republican elephant and popularizing the Democratic donkey. The Donkey actually had begun during the...

Richard Crowson

Don’t you feel sorry for all those millions of unfortunate souls who live in temperate, predictable, humdrum climates, while we in Kansas get to enjoy the glorious splendor of seasonal fickleness? Blistering windy summers morph into mild, windy falls which gradually change into ice-age-y, windy winters, which then give way to spring’s warmth and…um… windiness. Here we are now, for instance, having a delightful temperature dip, as we head toward autumn’s days of leafy breezes. Acorns are...

I’m not a huge fan of guns. But I used to like them. At one time I had 2 rifles, 7 pistols (including a snub-nose .38!) and a Tommy gun. I blasted away at anything that moved. It made me feel powerful and important. I was 9. My room was protected, not by Smith and Wesson but by Mattel. Real guns were absent from our home. My dad wasn’t a hunter so I didn’t inherit that tradition. Visits to my Uncle Curt’s farm in North Mississippi, however, fed my appetite for shooting. He’d let me plink away...

hotgossipitalia / Flickr / Creative Commons

Our celebrity-obsessed culture has a lot of trouble handling death. Arguably our ordinary everyday American culture does as well, but in the aftermath of Robin Williams’ passing, it’s become obvious that the end of a celebrity’s life can just leave us mystified. If that celebrity dies through his or her own hand and while the star of their celebrity-hood is still brightly illuminated, it’s even more perplexing to us. We feel we know them and our grieving process wants to treat them like...

Jellaluna / Flickr / Creative Commons

It strikes me that among the ethereal mysteries of our planet, there are some that it would be deeply challenging to explain to a visitor from another world. Some of these pleasures are things like music, art and lightning bugs. “Earth is really pretty cool,” I’d say. “We’ve got these sounds that we call 'music' that alter our state of mind. Then we have images that people create by combining colors in such a way that simply looking at them can transport us to another place. We call that 'art...

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