school funding

Kansas News Service/File photo

The top Democrats in the Kansas Legislature are calling on Senate President Susan Wagle not to wait until January to start work on fulfilling a Kansas Supreme Court order to fix funding for public schools.

Senate Minority Leader Anthony Hensley, of Topeka, and his counterpart in the House, Jim Ward of Wichita, wrote a letter to Wagle, who heads the Legislative Coordinating Council, seeking an interim bipartisan panel of House and Senate members.

Orlin Wagner / AP

Last week the state lost again at the Kansas Supreme Court, which unanimously ruled that Kansas is underfunding its public schools, with repercussions for academically struggling children across the state — and especially for students and taxpayers who live in resource-poor school districts. 

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Wichita Public Schools officials say the Kansas Supreme Court ruling on Monday, which finds that the state’s school funding formula is unconstitutional, is a “positive thing for Kansas kids.”

Orlin Wagner / AP

Updated Oct. 3 at 10:05 a.m.

The Kansas Supreme Court on Monday struck down the state’s aid to schools as unconstitutionally low — and unfair to poor school districts in particular. The decision could pressure lawmakers to increase school funding by hundreds of millions of dollars. 

Sam Zeff / KCUR

Despite the ongoing fight over how much Kansas should spend on schools, the Legislature did at least one thing this year that almost all educators were pleased with: For the first time, it included all-day kindergarten in the school funding formula.

That means districts no longer have to use money from other parts of their budgets or charge parents for all-day K.

Alberto G. / flickr Creative Commons

The results of the state's latest ACT test shows the number of Kansas students who are college-ready is on the decline.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

As dozens of Kansas school districts spar with the state over funding for public education, the term “Rose standards” has emerged as arcane but critical jargon among lawyers and judges, and surfaced over and over again in court documents.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

Tens of millions of dollars in extra state funding that legislators approved this spring amid pressure from an ongoing school finance lawsuit could go toward raising teacher pay.

Christopher Sessums / flickr Creative Commons

Today is the first day of school for some Wichita students; USD 259's official first day is Wednesday.

As students return to class, the big question looming over Wichita Public Schools and other districts in Kansas is whether the state’s school funding formula is constitutional.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service/File photo

This story was updated on Wednesday at 11:42 a.m.

Attorneys for the state and the Legislature faced a barrage of questions from skeptical Kansas Supreme Court justices Tuesday scrutinizing the Legislature’s school finance plan.

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