Sedgwick County

KPTS

The Sedgwick County Commission tabled a resolution Wednesday that would have asked the state to withhold benefits from undocumented immigrants, saving resources for lawful citizens of the county.

The resolution asked for the state to revise a law that allows undocumented immigrants to get in-state tuition at state colleges and universities if they have gone to school in Kansas for three years and have pursued a path to legal status.

Sedgwickcounty.org

An agreement between the city and county over ambulance services will hold for another year, but there may still be efforts to renegotiate it. 

Wichita City Council members couldn’t get the votes at their meeting Tuesday to formally notify Sedgwick County that it would be ending a 13-year-old agreement over local ambulance services.  

Courtesy

After nearly 30 years on Murdock Street, the Sedgwick County tag office in downtown Wichita is moving west.

The Murdock location will close at 5 p.m. on Friday and open at Douglas and Meridian inside the former Dillons store on Monday at noon.

“We are going to move all weekend long and we’ll have everything set up," says Sedgwick County Treasurer Linda Kizzire. "We’ll have clerks at the location early. We’ve got to test all the computers, the software, make sure everything is going to be operational before we open the doors to the public.”

Deborah Shaar / KMUW

A group of Wichita-area health leaders and elected officials toured the Tulsa Health Department last weekend. As KMUW's Deborah Shaar reports, it was the first step in a new Public Health Sister City Program.

Eleven public safety departments in south-central Kansas are hiring, and they’re hoping to fill open positions through a job fair on Wednesday.

The Wichita Workforce Center is hosting the first joint job fair for public safety careers. 

There’s a need for more police officers, firefighters and first responders throughout the region. Wichita Police Deputy Chief Troy Livingston says the department also needs to fill positions beyond law enforcement.

wichita.edu

Sedgwick County and City of Wichita officials are scheduled to meet Tuesday to discuss plans for a joint law enforcement training center.

County commissioners voted 3-2 on Wednesday to pursue a meeting with the city to go over four proposals and the evaluation process.

The county’s Bid Board is recommending that the training facility be built on Wichita State University’s Innovation Campus. The estimated cost would be $9.5 million dollars.

Ark Valley Fire Buff / Flickr

Sedgwick County Commissioners are putting off a decision on a new law enforcement training center for at least another week.

The commissioners want to hold a special meeting with the City of Wichita to go over the broader issue of public safety partnerships before they decide on a proposal for a new law enforcement training center.

Jason Rojas / Flickr

Sedgwick County and the City of Wichita are facing a May 18 deadline for finalizing an agreement for a new law enforcement training center.

The county commissioners are set to take up the issue at their Wednesday meeting.

The county’s bid board is recommending the commissioners accept a proposal to build a new law enforcement training center on Wichita State University’s Innovation Campus. The facility would replace the current center, a former elementary school on West 37th Street North that’s more than 30 years old and wasn’t meeting training needs.

Sean Sandefur / KMUW

Sedgwick County Commissioner Karl Peterjohn is up for re-election this year, and he could have a potential challenger in Goddard Mayor Marcey Gregory.

Raging Wire, flickr Creative Commons

Efforts to bring slot machines to a racetrack facility in Sedgwick County face a new roadblock.

Kansas’ attorney general issued a legal opinion on gaming Friday that says adding gaming machines would violate both a contract and state law.

The attorney general issued a 23-page response to State Rep. Mark Kahrs.

Kahrs is questioning the legality of pending legislation in the Kansas House (HB 2537) that would expand gambling in the state, among other things.

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