Sedgwick County

Courtesy photo

A tornado tore through midtown Tulsa, Oklahoma, on Sunday. Emergency officials did not immediately sound sirens. The incident raised the question: What procedures are being used here in Sedgwick County when a storm is approaching?

The Tulsa tornado had moved on by the time the National Weather Service issued a warning. As a result, emergency management officials reportedly did not sound the sirens.

Cody Charvat, training and exercise manager with Sedgwick County Emergency Management, says that the county has two criteria for deciding to sound the sirens.

El Alvi / Flickr Creative Commons

The Sedgwick County Department of Health is offering vaccinations for kids heading back to school in the fall.

Students can get state-required immunizations at the health department’s Main Clinic. Insurance, plus Medicaid and Medicare, are accepted, and vaccinations are available on a sliding fee scale for kids without coverage.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Early voting began last week at the Sedgwick County election office for the Aug. 1 primary election. Satellite polling places across Sedgwick County will also open later this week.

upupa4me / flickr Creative Commons

Advance ballots for the Aug. 1 primary election for city council races around Sedgwick County started going out last week. There will be some changes to how voters will receive and return their ballots.

Sedgwick County

Sedgwick County Manager Mike Scholes presented a recommended budget to commissioners on Wednesday. As it stands, the 2018 budget is just over $425 million.

Priority areas include safe and secure communities, human services, cultural experiences, communications and engagement and effective government organization. Scholes told commissioners the portion of the budget for the fire district is a projected surplus for the first time in many years.

Becky McCray / flickr Creative Commons

Tuesday is the deadline to register to vote in next month’s primary election.

Only residents in Wichita District 1, Park City Ward 3 or Haysville Ward 4 really need to worry about the deadline —those are the only races that will be on the primary ballot on Aug. 1.

Sedgwick County

A Georgia man pleaded guilty on Thursday to federal charges that he was part of an e-mail spoofing scheme that cost Sedgwick County more than half a million dollars.

Forty-nine-year-old George James pleaded guilty to one count of wire fraud. James admitted that Sedgwick County sent about $566,000 to his Wells Fargo bank account in Georgia last October.

James denied that the fraud scheme was his idea. He said that he was contacted by a person identified in court records as A.H., who asked to deposit some money into James’ account at Wells Fargo.

KOMUnews / flickr Creative Commons

The City of Wichita and Sedgwick County had a busy few days dealing with fireworks complaints and fires.

The non-emergency nuisance call line received 826 calls through Tuesday night with noise and other fireworks complaints.

But officials report that the emergency 911 calls were up to 2000 a day versus a regular load of 1500.

Five fires were started last night, including one reported in a truck bed while the truck was driving down the road. Another fire was started on the exterior wall of a garage.

Nick Fullerton / Flickr Creative Commons

City and county buildings will be closed Tuesday for the Fourth of July holiday.

Wichita’s City Hall, neighborhood resource centers and all public library locations will be closed. Botanica, Old Cowtown Museum, the Mid-America All Indian Center and the Wichita Art Museum also will be closed.

Park and Recreation Centers will be closed for Independence Day, but O.J. Watson Park will be open, and city pools will be open from 1 to 5 p.m.

Other closures include:

Marissa Elkind / flickr Creative Commons

Sedgwick County fire officials are issuing a reminder about the dangers of fireworks and hand-held sparklers that are often used to celebrate the Fourth of July holiday.

Division Chief Robert Timmons of Sedgwick County Fire District 1 says keeping a bucket of water nearby will help prevent injuries and fires during home celebrations.

Sparklers may seem like a less-risky firework alternative, but Timmons says it’s important to remember that sparklers burn at 1200 degrees, which is hotter than the temperatures needed to burn wood.

Pages