Sedgwick County Commission

Deborah Shaar / KMUW

Three of the four candidates running for the Sedgwick County Commission participated in a forum on community issues Saturday.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW, File Photo

The Sedgwick County Commissioners are taking their regularly scheduled weekly meeting to the zoo on Tuesday.

It will be the third time this year that the commissioners are holding their public meeting in the evening and at a location within one of the five districts.

Tuesday’s meeting at the Sedgwick County Zoo in west Wichita is in Commissioner Karl Peterjohn’s 3rd District.

The commissioners will get an update on the county projects in the 3rd District, and hear reports on the juvenile justice and criminal justice programs.

Rosie O'Beirne, flickr Creative Commons

The Sedgwick County Commission renewed a $940,000 federal grant on Wednesday morning for a housing program that helps homeless people.

The Shelter Plus Care housing program targets three specific homeless populations: those with mental illness, those who have substance abuse issues and those with HIV/AIDS.

Tim Kaufman with the Department of Public Services says the program provides housing vouchers with a care component.

Downtown Mulvane Facebook

Sedgwick County Commissioners have called for a state of emergency after a flash flood caused severe damage in the town of Mulvane last week.

The declaration makes Mulvane eligible for state and federal disaster assistance funding. This is the first time since the Oaklawn Tornado in 2012 that the county has had to declare a state of local disaster emergency.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Sedgwick County is planning to expand the Regional Forensic Science Center in order to meet the increasing demand for DNA analysis in criminal cases.

The $4 million project will begin in 2018, and it will be the second expansion in the center’s 21-year history. KMUW’s Deborah Shaar had an opportunity to see how crime science happens.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW

A group of health leaders from Tulsa will be in Wichita on Monday to learn about Sedgwick County’s health system. The visit is part of the Public Health Sister City program.

Wichita health leaders and elected officials visited Tulsa back in May, and now it’s Tulsa’s turn to learn about the state of health in Wichita.

Sedgwick County Commission Chairman Jim Howell says there are a lot of similarities between the two health departments, but funding levels are different. He says the Tulsa Health Department spends about twice as much on its services as Sedgwick County.

Sedgwick County Proposes New Funding Model For Zoo

Aug 16, 2016
Travel KS / Flickr

The Sedgwick County Commission is proposing a plan to bring more stability, and less politics, into annual funding talks with the zoo.

 

The commission has been in negotiations with the Sedgwick County Zoological Society over future funding and operating agreements for months. Commission Chairman Jim Howell says a new plan is meant to clear up much of the contention. 

Deborah Shaar / KMUW, File Photo

The Sedgwick County Commissioners have approved the county’s 2017 operating budget. The commissioners restored a county health department position that was cut last year.

ARC95 Study Facebook

The public is being invited to give input on the Arkansas River Crossing-95th Street South (ARC95) Study.

Meetings will be held to discuss the needs and feasibility of improving the 95th Street corridor in southern Sedgwick County. The study area includes 95th Street South between Greenwich Road and Meridian Avenue, with an initial focus on the section between Woodlawn Boulevard and Broadway Avenue.

sedgwickcounty.org

The final public hearing on the Sedgwick County budget takes place on Thursday night. County commissioners are expected to vote on the 2017 budget proposal next week.

KMUW’s Deborah Shaar explains the forecasted operating deficit.

The county manager is recommending a budget of $424 million with an operating deficit of about $4.5 million.

The deficit will be due primarily to one-time capital improvement projects and the commissioners’ desire to fund road and bridge projects with cash instead of bonds.

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