Sedgwick County Commission

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The Sedgwick County Commission agreed on Wednesday to allow the Division of Corrections to submit a $3 million grant to the state.

The money would be used for five programs which are designed to prevent and address juvenile delinquency. Three of the programs, which constitute the majority of the grant, are for programs operated by the state, including the Juvenile Intake and Assessment Center (JIAC).

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Sedgwick County is moving forward with the remaining renovation work on its Ronald Reagan Building in downtown Wichita.

County commissioners voted unanimously on Wednesday to approve a $1.3 million contract with Key Construction.

Work on the fourth through sixth floors of the building at 271 W. 3rd St. will begin in June and take about five months.

Sedgwick County spokeswoman Kate Flavin says when four county departments move in, the building will be fully occupied.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW/File photo

Programs that help adults who commit felony crimes get their lives back on track will continue in Sedgwick County. County commissioners on Wednesday approved a $4 million grant application to the Kansas Department of Corrections for the Community Corrections programs.

The Community Corrections programs are state-mandated and mostly state funded.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Sedgwick County commissioners signed off on two grants on Wednesday for programs at the County Health Department and the Regional Forensic Science Center.

The commissioners voted 5-0 to accept a $1.9 million grant from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

Health Department Director Adrienne Byrne told commissioners the grant is a longstanding funding source for various health department programs.

"Without this funding, many of our programs would be drastically reduced or services not be able to be provided," Byrne said.

Sedgwick County

Sedgwick County will no longer publish its legal notices in the Wichita Eagle. Commissioners voted Wednesday in favor of a cheaper vendor.

The county will begin publishing its legal notices—such as delinquent taxes and notices of lawsuits—in the Derby Weekly Informer.

Commissioners said the change will save taxpayers money: The Wichita Eagle, the county’s current vendor, would have cost an estimated $133,000 a year. The Informer would cost and estimated $56,000.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

A new citizens advisory board is being established in Sedgwick County’s 3rd District.

Commissioner David Dennis represents District 3, which comprises the western half of the county. It includes large parts of west Wichita as well as Goddard, Cheney, Colwich, Mount Hope and Garden Plain.

Commissioners voted unanimously Wednesday to support Dennis’ proposal for the citizens advisory board. He said he’s creating the board to fulfill a campaign promise to get more public input on county matters.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW/File Photo

The Sedgwick County commissioners reversed course on whether the county health department should provide travel immunizations.

At their meeting on Wednesday, commissioners voted 3-2 to reinstate the program.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

The Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office on Wednesday asked commissioners for input on how to respond to a recent executive order on immigration. The county stands to lose millions in federal funding if it doesn’t comply with the controversial order.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW/File photo

The Sedgwick County Commission approved funding and renewed its partnership with the Project Access health care program Wednesday.

Project Access coordinates medical care and the supplies needed to treat people who are low-income or don’t have insurance. Doctors donate their time to treat eligible patients, hospitals donate the use of their facility, and thousands of dollars worth of medical equipment and prescription medicines are donated as needed during treatment.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW

Sedgwick County commissioners elected their 2017 leaders at a meeting Wednesday morning.

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