Supreme Court

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On July 28, 1868, Secretary of State William H. Seward issued a proclamation certifying the ratification of the 14th Amendment to the U.S, Constitution. This amendment extended citizenship to anyone born in the United States; guaranteed equal protection, due process, and privileges and immunities; and tasked the federal government to enforce these rights for all citizens.

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Same-sex couples living in all 105 Kansas counties can now get married, but there are still roadblocks in state government for some services. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, LGBT advocates are calling for the state government to update the rules following last week’s Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage.

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The United States Supreme Court decided two landmark cases this past week. One affirmed subsidies for Americans purchasing health care insurance on a federal exchange. In a second case, Obergefell v. Hodges, the court, after refusing to hear earlier cases, declared same-sex marriage to be a right guaranteed under the Constitution, by expanding the penumbra of a constitutional right to gay couples.

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Same-sex couples could get marriage licenses in all 105 Kansas counties Tuesday, but the state wasn't yet allowing gay and lesbian spouses to change their last names on driver's licenses or file joint income tax returns.

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The U.S. Supreme Court, in a 5 to 4 decision, has ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency must take costs into consideration when regulating power plant emissions.

The EPA issued a rule in 2011 requiring electric utilities to minimize their emissions of mercury and other toxic substances from their smokestacks. Westar Energy’s Executive Director of Environmental Services, Brad Loveless, says the equipment is expensive, and the activated carbon it uses would be an ongoing expense.

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The Supreme Court ruled today that same-sex couples can marry in all 50 states and their unions must be recognized. The decision was 5-4.

Gay and lesbian couples already could marry in 36 states, including Kansas, and the District of Columbia. The court's ruling means the remaining 14 states, in the South and Midwest, will have to stop enforcing their bans on same-sex marriage.

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Millions of Americans who obtained health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, popularly known as Obamacare, are now breathing a sigh of relief, following a decision from the U.S. Supreme Court.

More than 6 million lower income Americans got subsidies to help them buy health insurance on the federal marketplace, known as healthcare.gov. Without those subsidies, most of them wouldn’t be able to afford the premiums.

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Some states are scrambling to make sure that citizens can still get federal subsidies for buying health insurance, no matter how the Supreme Court rules in a pending case. But as the Heartland Health Monitor’s Bryan Thompson reports, Kansas has no back-up plan.

The Supreme Court is weighing whether a flaw in the wording of the Affordable Care Act means subsidies are not legal in the 34 states that rely on the federal health insurance exchange known as the marketplace.

The Sedgwick County Courthouse is turning away same-sex couples who are seeking marriage licenses.

Kerry Wilks and Donna Ditrani, along with their minister, went to the Wichita courthouse yesterday. After the clerk refused to give them paperwork to get a marriage license, the couple said they would be happy to "join the cause" as plaintiffs in a lawsuit expected to be filed by the American Civil Liberties Union, challenging the Kansas ban.

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  The U.S. Supreme Court announced Monday morning that they would not move forward with same-sex marriage appeals in five states, which looked to make the unions illegal. The decision allows same-sex couples to begin applying for marriage licenses in their state. It could also mean same-sex marriage is coming to Kansas.

 Back in June, the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals struck down bans on same-sex marriage in both Utah and Oklahoma. Appeals brought before the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse those rulings were turned away, effectively making same-sex marriage legal in those states.

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