Supreme Court

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Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt has asked the state Supreme Court to reconsider its opinions in a group of DUI cases in light of a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision.

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Court-appointed lawyers in Kansas say they need more money to defend high-profile murder cases, like the Carr brothers from Wichita.

The U.S. Supreme Court recently upheld the death penalty sentences handed down in that case and in another Kansas murder case. Because of the ruling, court-appointed attorneys will have to continue working on those cases, and that will take more money. 

Abigail Wilson / KMUW

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled in favor of reinstating the death penalty for the Carr Brothers and another death row inmate named Sidney Gleason, who was convicted in a separate case.

National Photo Company, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs

On July 28, 1868, Secretary of State William H. Seward issued a proclamation certifying the ratification of the 14th Amendment to the U.S, Constitution. This amendment extended citizenship to anyone born in the United States; guaranteed equal protection, due process, and privileges and immunities; and tasked the federal government to enforce these rights for all citizens.

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Same-sex couples living in all 105 Kansas counties can now get married, but there are still roadblocks in state government for some services. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, LGBT advocates are calling for the state government to update the rules following last week’s Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage.

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The United States Supreme Court decided two landmark cases this past week. One affirmed subsidies for Americans purchasing health care insurance on a federal exchange. In a second case, Obergefell v. Hodges, the court, after refusing to hear earlier cases, declared same-sex marriage to be a right guaranteed under the Constitution, by expanding the penumbra of a constitutional right to gay couples.

Weho City, flickr Creative Commons

Same-sex couples could get marriage licenses in all 105 Kansas counties Tuesday, but the state wasn't yet allowing gay and lesbian spouses to change their last names on driver's licenses or file joint income tax returns.


The U.S. Supreme Court, in a 5 to 4 decision, has ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency must take costs into consideration when regulating power plant emissions.

The EPA issued a rule in 2011 requiring electric utilities to minimize their emissions of mercury and other toxic substances from their smokestacks. Westar Energy’s Executive Director of Environmental Services, Brad Loveless, says the equipment is expensive, and the activated carbon it uses would be an ongoing expense.

AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

The Supreme Court ruled today that same-sex couples can marry in all 50 states and their unions must be recognized. The decision was 5-4.

Gay and lesbian couples already could marry in 36 states, including Kansas, and the District of Columbia. The court's ruling means the remaining 14 states, in the South and Midwest, will have to stop enforcing their bans on same-sex marriage.

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Millions of Americans who obtained health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, popularly known as Obamacare, are now breathing a sigh of relief, following a decision from the U.S. Supreme Court.

More than 6 million lower income Americans got subsidies to help them buy health insurance on the federal marketplace, known as Without those subsidies, most of them wouldn’t be able to afford the premiums.